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quotations The Best Immanuel Kant Quotes  

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A list of the best Immanuel Kant quotes. This list is arranged by which famous Immanuel Kant quotes have received the most votes, so only the greatest Immanuel Kant quotes are at the top of the list. All the most popular quotes from Immanuel Kant should be listed here, but if any were missed you can add more at the end of the list. This list includes notable Immanuel Kant quotes on various subjects, many of which are inspirational and thought provoking.

This list answers the questions, "What are the best Immanuel Kant quotes?" and "What is the most famous Immanuel Kant quote?"

You can see what subjects these historic Immanuel Kant quotes fall under displayed to the right of the quote. Be sure to vote so your favorite Immanuel Kant saying won't fall to the bottom of the list.

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Live your life as though your every act were to become a universal law. Immanuel Kant

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Science is organized knowledge. Wisdom is organized life. Immanuel Kant

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Thoughts without content are empty, intuitions without concepts are blind. Immanuel Kant

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Seek not the favor of the multitude; it is seldom got by honest and lawful means. But seek the testimony of few; and number not voices, but weigh them. Immanuel Kant

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From such crooked wood as that which man is made of, nothing straight can be fashioned. Immanuel Kant

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Two things fill me with constantly increasing admiration and awe, the longer and more earnestly I reflect on them: the starry heavens without and the moral law within. Immanuel Kant

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By a lie, a man...annihilates his dignity as a man. Immanuel Kant

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Morality is not the doctrine of how we may make ourselves happy, but how we may make ourselves worthy of happiness. Immanuel Kant

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So act that your principle of action might safely be made a law for the whole world. Immanuel Kant

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It is not God's will merely that we should be happy, but that we should make ourselves happy Immanuel Kant

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AllenGovind added A person is only a person when it has the power to make sense of its surrounding.

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Ours is an age of criticism, to which everything must be subjected. The sacredness of religion, and the authority of legislation, are by many regarded as grounds for exemption from the examination by this tribunal, But, if they are exempted, and cannot lay claim to sincere respect, which reason accords only to that which has stood the test of a free and public examination. Immanuel Kant

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There is, therefore, only one categorical imperative. It is: Act only according to that maxim by which you can at the same time will that it should become a universal law. Immanuel Kant

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All the interests of my reason, speculative as well as practical, combine in the three following questions: 1. What can I know? 2. What ought I to do? 3. What may I hope? Immanuel Kant

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Give me matter, and I will construct a world out of it! Immanuel Kant

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Out of timber so crooked as that from which man is made nothing entirely straight can be carved. Immanuel Kant

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What can I know? What ought I to do? What can I hope? Immanuel Kant

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Intuition and concepts constitute... the elements of all our knowledge, so that neither concepts without an intuition in some way corresponding to them, nor intuition without concepts, can yield knowledge. Immanuel Kant

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Two things fill the mind with ever new and increasing admiration and awe... Immanuel Kant

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Nothing is divine but what is agreeable to reason. Immanuel Kant

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Act as if the maxim of your action were to become through your will a be general natural law. Immanuel Kant

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All thought must, directly or indirectly, by way of certain characters, relate ultimately to intuitions, and therefore, with us, to sensibility, because in no other way can an object be given to us. Immanuel Kant