social media Woman Asks Tinder For The Personal Data They Have About Her, Gets Back 800-Page Report  

Erin McCann
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The Judith Duportail Tinder involves a horrible online dating experience, but rather than matching with a necrophile or Nickelback fan, she requested her Tinder information, which arrived as an 800-page Tinder report. The French journalist gawked at what she found in the company's stash, a variety intimate details of her life neatly organized into one document. In addition to gathering information you provide, Tinder collects personal data you delete, and streamlines it into in-depth reports to, in their words, get you the best match. If the online dating app knows everything about her, what do they know about the celebrities who use Tinder or anyone else? And for that matter, what do other social platforms also know about her?

Duportail's Tinder report proves the company logged information that likely never had anything to do with finding her a match. The company claims collecting information is necessary in order to help create the best possible match for clients, but remains hazy about what it does with users' personal data after the fact. However, the fact Tinder collects personal data doesn't set them apart from other websites and apps. Companies like Google and Facebook store your details as well, whether you use them for personalized advertising or not. And although you know your file exists, getting a company to give it up is almost as much a nightmare as the loss of your right to privacy.

The Report Contains An Insane Amount Of Personal Details


The Report Contains An Insane ... is listed (or ranked) 1 on the list Woman Asks Tinder For The Personal Data They Have About Her, Gets Back 800-Page Report
Photo:  Judith Duportail/Twitter

Tinder claims to collect data from its users in order to provide them with the best possible match. The 800 pages of Duportail's report includes an insane amount of personal details about her, including her occupation, education, and location. But since technology is always listening, watching, and documenting everything you do, Tinder's information goes much deeper than just her surface facts. The report also contains intimate details such as Duportail's taste in music, hobbies, and even what kind of men she was interested in.

Tinder Recorded Her Behavior On Social Media


Tinder Recorded Her Behavior O... is listed (or ranked) 2 on the list Woman Asks Tinder For The Personal Data They Have About Her, Gets Back 800-Page Report
Photo:  b_earth_photos/Flickr/CC BY 2.0

Any social media accounts you connect to your Tinder profile grant the app access to your information. This includes Facebook and Instagram, and anything posted on those sites also gets tracked by Tinder. Duportail's report contained information about her Facebook "likes" and photos she uploaded on Instagram, even long after she deleted the images and her account. But more social platforms than just Tinder keep an eye on your information. Facebook and other apps gather the same things and likely possess a lengthy file on you as well.

The Report Detailed All Of Her Tinder Conversations


When looking at her report, Duportail noted Tinder kept careful track of all her conversations and interactions with matches, including her location, the dates and times contact was made, and how many times she and a match interacted. The report featured an crazy amount of detail as well, including information about a joke she copied, pasted, and sent to three different matches. Reading through all 1,700 Tinder messages was a lot for Duportail, who saw it as a detailed reminder of all her "hopes, fears, sexual preferences, and deepest secrets."

Tinder And Other App Users Carelessly Give Away Information


Digital technology sociologist Luke Stark points out Tinder and other app users tend to give out personal information due to the fact that although these details are intimate, they aren't linked to any emotion. The information feels just like numbers, dates, and random facts when you hand it out, until it's used against you. A UK study found 70% of people have no problem disclosing personal information online, even though many of those people would be wary of using their credit card to make online purchases or putting their phone number on their pages.