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The Best Daniel Webster Quotes

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A list of the best Daniel Webster quotes. This list is arranged by which famous Daniel Webster quotes have received the most votes, so only the greatest Daniel Webster quotes are at the top of the list. All the most popular quotes from Daniel Webster should be listed here, but if any were missed you can add more at the end of the list. This list includes notable Daniel Webster quotes on various subjects, many of which are inspirational and thought provoking.

This list answers the questions, "What are the best Daniel Webster quotes?" and "What is the most famous Daniel Webster quote?"

You can see what subjects these historic Daniel Webster quotes fall under displayed to the right of the quote. Be sure to vote so your favorite Daniel Webster saying won't fall to the bottom of the list.
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  • 1
    18
    6

    It is, Sir, as I have said, a small College, And yet, there are those who love it.

    Daniel Webster
  • 2
    11
    4

    The most important thought that ever occupied my mind is that of my individual responsibility to God.

    Daniel Webster
  • 3
    12
    6

    If we work upon marble, it will perish; if we work on brass, time will efface it. If we rear temples, they will crumble to dust. But if we work on mens immortal minds, if we impress on them high principles, the just fear of God, and love for their fellow-men, we engrave on those tablets something which no time can efface, and which will brighten and brighten to all eternity.

    Daniel Webster
  • 4
    9
    2

    God grants liberty only to those who love it, and are always ready to guard and defend it.

    Daniel Webster
  • 5
    13
    9

    Whatever makes men good Christians, makes them good citizens.

    Daniel Webster
  • 6
    8
    4

    Philosophical argument has sometimes shaken my reason for the faith that was in me; but my heart has always assured me that the Gospel of Jesus Christ must be reality.

    Daniel Webster
  • 7
    5
    0

    Whatever government is not a government of laws, is a despotism, let it be called what it may.

    Daniel Webster
  • 8
    4
    0

    The union, one and inseparable, now and forever

  • 9
    6
    2

    The contest, for ages, has been to rescue Liberty from the grasp of executive power.

    Daniel Webster
  • 10
    5
    2

    He who tampers with the currency robs labor of its bread.

    Daniel Webster
  • 11
    5
    2

    We have been taught to regard a representative of the people as a sentinel on the watch-tower of liberty.

    Daniel Webster
  • 12
    4
    2

    While the Union lasts, we have high, exciting, gratifying prospects spread out before us, for us and our children. Beyond that I seek not to penetrate the veil. God grant that in my day, at least, that curtain may not rise! God grant that on my vision never may be opened what lies behind! When my eyes shall be turned to behold for the last time the sun in heaven, may I not see him shining on the broken and dishonored fragments of a once glorious Union; on States dissevered, discordant, belligerent; on a land rent with civil feuds, or drenched, it may be, in fraternal blood! Let their last feeble and lingering glance rather behold the gorgeous ensign of the republic, now known and honored throughout the earth, still full and high advanced, its arms and trophies streaming in their original lustre, not a strip erased or polluted, nor a single star obscured, bearing for its motto, no such miserable interrogatory as What is all this worth? nor those other words of delusion and folly, Liberty first and Union afterwards; but everywhere, spread all over in characters of living light, blazing on all its ample folds, as they float over the sea and over the land, and in every wind under the whole heavens, that other sentiment, dear to every true American heart,Liberty and Union, now and for ever, one and inseparable!

    Daniel Webster
  • 13
    6
    4

    Keep cool; anger is not an argument.

    Daniel Webster
  • 14
    6
    4

    A mass of men equals a mass of opinions.

    Daniel Webster
  • 15
    5
    4

    One country, one constitution, one destiny.

    Daniel Webster
  • 16
    4
    2

    When tillage begins, other arts follow. The farmers, therefore, are the founders of human civilization.

    Daniel Webster
  • 17
    4
    2

    Mind is the great lever of all things.

    Daniel Webster
  • 18
    4
    4

    There is always room at the top.

    Daniel Webster
  • 19
    4
    4

    The world is governed more by appearances than by realities, so that it is fully as necessary to seem to know something as to know it.

    Daniel Webster
  • 20
    6
    0

    When the mariner has been tossed for many days in thick weather, and on an unknown sea, he naturally avails himself of the first pause in the storm, the earliest glance of the sun, to take his latitude, and ascertain how far the elements have driven him from his true course. Let us imitate this prudence, and, before we float farther on the waves of this debate, refer to the point from which we departed, that we may at least be able to conjecture where we now are.

    Daniel Webster
  • 21
    4
    6

    There is no refuge from confession but suicide; and suicide is confession.

    Daniel Webster
  • 22
    3
    0

    Liberty consists in wholesome restraint.

    Daniel Webster
  • 23
    2
    0

    He smote the rock of the national resources, and abundant streams of revenue gushed forth. He touched the dead corpse of the Public Credit, and it sprung upon its feet. The fabled birth of Minerva, from the brain of Jove, was hardly more sudden or more perfect than the financial system of the United States, as it burst forth from the conceptions of Alexander Hamilton.

    Daniel Webster
  • 24
    3
    2

    The freest government, if it could exist, would not be long acceptable, if the tendency of the laws were to create a rapid accumulation of property in few hands, and to render the great mass of the population dependent and penniless. In such a case, the popular power would be likely to break in upon the rights of property, or else the influence of property to limit and control the exercise of popular power. Universal suffrage, for example, could not long exist in a community where there was great inequality of property. In the nature of things, those who have not property, and see their neighbors possess much more than they think them to need, cannot be favorable to laws made for the protection of property. When this class becomes numerous, it grows clamorous. It looks on property as its prey and plunder, and is naturally ready, at all times, for violence and revolution.

    Daniel Webster
  • 25
    3
    2

    The past is at least secure.

    Daniel Webster