America

The Best Theodore Roosevelt Quotes  

Reference
6.2k votes 1k voters 33.1k views 104 items

List Rules Must be a famous or well-known quote. If a quote is cut off you can hover over the text to see the full quote.

A list of the best Theodore Roosevelt quotes. This list is arranged by which famous Theodore Roosevelt quotes have received the most votes, so only the greatest Theodore Roosevelt quotes are at the top of the list. All the most popular quotes from Theodore Roosevelt should be listed here, but if any were missed you can add more at the end of the list. This list includes notable Theodore Roosevelt quotes on various subjects, many of which are inspirational and thought provoking.

This list answers the questions, "What are the best Theodore Roosevelt quotes?" and "What is the most famous Theodore Roosevelt quote?"

You can see what subjects these historic Theodore Roosevelt quotes fall under displayed to the right of the quote. Be sure to vote so your favorite Theodore Roosevelt saying won't fall to the bottom of the list.
list ordered by
1
The man who makes no mistakes does not usually make anything Theodore Roosevelt
2
The nation behaves well if it treats the natural resources as assets which it must turn over to the next generation increased, and not impaired, in value. Theodore Roosevelt
3
Do what you can, with what you have, where you are. Theodore Roosevelt
4
Speak softly and carry a big stick; you will go far. Theodore Roosevelt
5
No man is above the law, and no man is below it. Theodore Roosevelt
6
A man who is good enough to shed his blood for his country is good enough to be given a square deal afterwards. More than that no man is entitled to, and less than that no man shall have. Theodore Roosevelt
7
I don't pity any man who does hard work worth doing. I admire him. I pity the creature who does not work, at whichever end of the social scale he may regard himself as being. Theodore Roosevelt
8
There has never yet been a man in our history who led a life of ease whose name is worth remembering. Theodore Roosevelt
9
We wish peace, but we wish the peace of justice, the peace of righteousness. We wish it because we think it is right and not because we are afraid. Theodore Roosevelt
10
Far better is it to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much, because they live in a gray twilight that knows not victory nor defeat. Theodore Roosevelt
11
It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, and comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat. Theodore Roosevelt
12
Our loyalty is due entirely to the United States. It is due to the President only and exactly to the degree in which he efficiently serves the United States. It is our duty to support him when he serves the United States well. It is our duty to oppose him when he serves it badly. This is true about Mr. Wilson now and it has been true about all our Presidents in the past. It is our duty at all times to tell the truth about the President and about every one else, save in the cases where to tell the truth at the moment would benefit the public enemy. Theodore Roosevelt
13
When they call the roll in the Senate, the senators do not know whether to answer present or not guilty. Theodore Roosevelt
14
It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed. In this life we get nothing save by effort. Theodore Roosevelt
15
The President is merely the most important among a large number of public servants. He should be supported or opposed exactly to the degree which is warranted by his good conduct or bad conduct, his efficiency or inefficiency in rendering loyal, able, and disinterested service to the nation as a whole. Therefore it is absolutely necessary that there should be full liberty to tell the truth about his acts, and this means that it is exactly as necessary to blame him when he does wrong as to praise him when he does right. Any other attitude in an American citizen is both base and servile. To announce that there must be no criticism of the President, or that we are to stand by the President, right or wrong, is not only unpatriotic and servile, but is morally treasonable to the American public. Nothing but the truth should be spoken about him or any one else. But it is even more important to tell the truth, pleasant or unpleasant, about him than about any one else. Theodore Roosevelt
16
To educate a man in mind and not in morals is to educate a menace to society. Theodore Roosevelt
17
A man who has never gone to school may steal from a freight car; but if he has a university education, he may steal the whole railroad. Theodore Roosevelt
18
Americanism means the virtues of courage, honor, justice, truth, sincerity, and hardihoodthe virtues that made America. The things that will destroy America are prosperity-at-any-price, peace-at-any-price, safety-first instead of duty-first, the love of soft living and the get-rich-quick theory of life. Theodore Roosevelt
19
The best executive is the one who has sense enough to pick good men to do what he wants done, and self restraint to keep from meddling with them while they do it. Theodore Roosevelt
20
If we lose the virile, manly qualities, and sink into a nation of mere hucksters, putting gain over national honor, and subordinating everything to mere ease of life, then we shall indeed reach a condition worse than that of the ancient civilizations in the years of their decay. Theodore Roosevelt
21
It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed. Theodore Roosevelt
22
It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, and comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat. Theodore Roosevelt
23
The most practical kind of politics is the politics of decency. Theodore Roosevelt
24
Here in the United States we turn our rivers and streams into sewers and dumping-grounds, we pollute the air, we destroy forests, and exterminate fishes, birds, and mammalsnot to speak of vulgarizing charming landscapes with hideous advertisements. But at last it looks as if our people were awakening. Many leading men, Americans and Canadians, are doing all they can for the Conservation movement. Theodore Roosevelt
25
The boy who is going to make a great man must not make up his mind merely to overcome a thousand obstacles, but to win in spite of a thousand repulses and defeats. Theodore Roosevelt