70s The Best Game Shows of the 1970s  

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List Rules Vote up the best game shows that aired during the 1970s

The 70s was a great time for game show viewers, whether they casually watched whatever show was on or were major enthusiasts of the genre, never missing an episode of their favorite game. During the 70s, many of the most famous game shows of all time were created, or perfected. While shows like Jeopardy, Match Game, and Let’s Make a Deal were continuing on from the 60s, there were many famous game shows that first aired in the 70s. This list includes game shows that aired during the 70s and has been ranked by the community. 

Game shows that aired in the 70s included amazing programs like The $20,000 Pyramid, The Gong Show, and Family Feud. Many 70s game shows included contestants and panelists of Hollywood stars. Hollywood Squares and Celebrity Sweepstakes were known for having big name stars on the roster. While shows like The $1.98 Beauty Show may not have stood the test of time, they were uniquely '70s television-programming.


What is are the best 1970s game shows? Did the game shows you think were the best make this list? Vote up the 70s game shows you think are the best or add them below if the aren't already on the list.

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Match Game is listed (or ranked) 1 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
Match Game Betty White, Patty Duke, Richard Dawson Match Game is an American television panel game show in which contestants attempted to match celebrities' answers to fill-in-the-blank questions. The precise format of the show varied through ...more

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Family Feud is listed (or ranked) 2 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
Family Feud Al Roker, Richard Dawson, Louie Anderson Family Feud is an American television game show created by Mark Goodson. The show features a competition in which two families must name the most popular responses to a survey question posed to ...more

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The Price Is Right is listed (or ranked) 3 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
The Price Is Right Bob Barker, Janice Pennington, Dian Parkinson The Price Is Right is an American television game show created by Mark Goodson and Bill Todman. The show revolves around contestants competing to identify accurate pricing of merchandise to win ...more

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The Newlywed Game is listed (or ranked) 4 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
The Newlywed Game Bob Hilton, Charlie O'Donnell, Johnny Jacobs The Newlywed Game is an American television game show that pits newly married couples against each other in a series of revealing question rounds to determine how well the spouses know or do not ...more

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Hollywood Squares is listed (or ranked) 5 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
Hollywood Squares Tom Bergeron, Shadoe Stevens, Whoopi Goldberg The Hollywood Squares is an American panel game show, in which two contestants play tic-tac-toe to win cash and prizes. The board for the game is a 3 × 3 vertical stack of open-faced ...more

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Let's Make a Deal is listed (or ranked) 6 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
Let's Make a Deal Wayne Brady, Jonathan Mangum, Rob Marrocco Jr. Let's Make a Deal is a television game show which originated in the United States and has since been produced in many countries throughout the world. The show is based around deals offered to ...more

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The $10,000 Pyramid is listed (or ranked) 7 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
The $10,000 Pyramid

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Password is listed (or ranked) 8 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
Password Betty White, Allen Ludden, Gene Wood Password is an American television game show which was created by Bob Stewart for Goodson-Todman Productions. The host was Allen Ludden, who had previously been well known as the host of the ...more

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The $20,000 Pyramid is listed (or ranked) 9 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s

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Name That Tune is listed (or ranked) 10 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
Name That Tune George DeWitt Name That Tune is an American television game show that put two contestants against each other to test their knowledge of songs. Premiering in the United States on NBC Radio in 1952, the show ...more

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The Dating Game is listed (or ranked) 11 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
The Dating Game Chuck Woolery, Brad Sherwood, Jim Lange The Dating Game is an ABC television show. It first aired on December 20, 1965 and was the first of many shows created and packaged by Chuck Barris from the 1960s through the 1980s. ABC dropped ...more

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The Gong Show is listed (or ranked) 12 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
The Gong Show Phyllis Diller, Michele Lee, George Gray The Gong Show is an amateur talent contest franchised by Sony Pictures Television to many countries. It was broadcast on NBC's daytime schedule from June 14, 1976, through July 21, 1978, and in ...more

The Best Survivor Contestants That Ever Played

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The Joker's Wild is listed (or ranked) 13 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
The Joker's Wild Charlie O'Donnell, Bill Cullen, Jack Barry The Joker's Wild is an American television game show that aired at different times during the 1970s through the 1990s. Contestants answered questions based on categories that were determined ...more

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Card Sharks is listed (or ranked) 14 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
Card Sharks Markie Post, Bob Eubanks, Gary Kroeger Card Sharks is an American television game show created by Chester Feldman for Mark Goodson-Bill Todman Productions. Two contestants compete for control of a row of oversized playing cards by ...more

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Jeopardy! is listed (or ranked) 15 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
Jeopardy! Alex Trebek, Johnny Gilbert, Jimmy McGuire Jeopardy! is an American television game show created by Merv Griffin. The show features a quiz competition in which contestants are presented with general knowledge clues in the form of ...more

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Wheel of Fortune is listed (or ranked) 16 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
Wheel of Fortune Pat Sajak, Vanna White, Charlie O'Donnell Wheel of Fortune is an American television game show created by Merv Griffin. The show features a competition in which contestants solve word puzzles, similar to those used in Hangman, to win ...more

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Truth or Consequences is listed (or ranked) 17 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
Truth or Consequences Ralph Edwards, Jack Bailey Truth or Consequences is an American television show originally hosted on NBC radio by Ralph Edwards and later on television by Edwards, Jack Bailey, Bob Barker, Bob Hilton and Larry Anderson. ...more

The Greatest Geeky Girls on TV

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The $25,000 Pyramid is listed (or ranked) 18 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
TVscum added The $25,000 Pyramid

Bill Cullen, Bob Clayton

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Concentration is listed (or ranked) 19 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
Concentration Ed McMahon, Hugh Downs, Gene Wood Concentration is an American television game show based on the children's memory game of the same name. Matching cards represented prizes that contestants could win. As matching pairs of cards ...more

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The New Treasure Hunt is listed (or ranked) 20 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
The New Treasure Hunt

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High Rollers is listed (or ranked) 21 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
High Rollers Alex Trebek High Rollers is an American television game show that involved players trying to win prizes by rolling dice. The format was based on the dice game Shut the Box. High Rollers debuted on July 1, ...more

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Double Dare is listed (or ranked) 22 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
TVscum added Double Dare

Alex Trebek, Johnny Olson

The Best Talk Shows of the 1970s

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Celebrity Sweepstakes is listed (or ranked) 23 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
Celebrity Sweepstakes Jim McKrell Celebrity Sweepstakes is an American television game show that aired on NBC's daytime schedule from April 1, 1974 to October 1, 1976. The show also had two separate weekly syndicated runs from ...more

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Pass the Buck is listed (or ranked) 24 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
TVscum added Pass the Buck Bill Cullen

This Bill Cullen-hosted show is last game show produced at the Ed Sullivan Theater, and as was the case with most Bob Stewart shows,  Bob Clayton took on announcing duties.  Four players started the game with a bank of $100, each required to give an answer which fit an announced subject.  For example:  Something found in an operating room.  Players, left to right might answer, a surgeon, a scalpel, an operating table, lights, oxygen, etc., (each correct answer worth $25 to the pot) until a player gave an unacceptable answer or repeated an answer.  If the next player in turn gave an acceptable answer, the wrong player is sent out of the game, to await the outcome. If the next player gives a bad answer, he/she is knocked out of play as well.  Play continues until one player remains, and that player wins the pot, and plays "Fast Bucks" for $5,000. 

"Fast Bucks" is played in as many as four 15-second rounds.  Round one requires a player to give the four answers hidden on the first level of the game board, to a subject.  Providing all four in 15 seconds wins $5,000.  If the player fails, but provides at least one correct answer, the game moves to the second level with three answers hidden on the board.  Three answers wins, but at least one correct answer continues the game to the next level with two answers hidden.  The top tier has only one answer needed for $5,000.  If the player fails to win the $5,000, he/she, plays another game, as do the three players eliminated earlier.  All four continue playing until one player wins $5,000, with the losers keeping whatever pot money they picked up along the way.  "Pass the Buck" performed fairly well for CBS for the first month of its run, then was killed by "Card Sharks" on NBC, which demanded less from the viewer.  This was a pretty good show which deserved a longer run.

Pass the Buck is a game show that aired on CBS television's daytime lineup from April 3 to June 30, 1978. The series was hosted by Bill Cullen and was created by Bob Stewart. Bob Clayton was the ...more

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Gambit is listed (or ranked) 25 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
Gambit Wink Martindale Gambit is an American television game show based on the card game blackjack, created by Heatter-Quigley Productions. The show originally ran on CBS from September 4, 1972 to December 10, 1976 ...more

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Three on a Match is listed (or ranked) 26 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
TVscum added Three on a Match Don Pardo, Bill Cullen

One of Bob Stewart's earlier creations pitted three players against one another in a True/False Q&A.  Three categories are presented, some with bonuses concealed, such as three free picks, or double money.  Players secretly lock in a bid, as to how many questions they want to answer, from one to four.  The bids are revealed, with the high bidder winning the first chance to select a category and answer the number of questions bid.  If the top two bidders match, the third bidder gets to answer the number of questions he/she bid.  If all three bids match, the bids are cleared, and new bids are made until at least one bid does not match the others.

If the top bidder is successful in answering all of his/her questions the pot is won ($10 for each number bid-- 3, 4, and 2 would result in a pot of $90).  That $90 goes to the player, and, if he/she chooses may, "Go to the board" to attempt to match three identical prizes concealed therein.  The board has 12 spaces, $20, $30 and $40 columns on top, red, green yellow and blue on the side, with four different prizes--one placed in each column.  A player must have a minimum of $90 to play the board--the minimum needed to pick three spaces (one in the $20 column, one in the $30 and one in the $40).  The player would say, $30 on the blue, and the corresponding space flips to reveal the prize.  The next choice might be $20 on the red.  If that space matches the first, play continues, however if another prize is revealed the game ends since the player only has $40 remaining--not enough to select two more spaces.  Now, if a player collects $90 in the round, he can elect NOT to play the board, hoping to collect more money, which would allow him/her to pick more spaces on the board.  The first player to match three prizes on the board, wins the prize, the game, and continues on to face two new challengers. 

Later in the show's run, the prizes on the board are replaced with symbols or photos, and the first player to match three symbols/photos, three times, wins the game and $5,000 in cash and prizes.  Additionally, if a player's FIRST three picks at the board match, he/she wins the game instantly, and a car.  During this version of the game, a player no longer had to retire after winning five games, but could stay on the show until defeated.

"Three on a Match" remained on NBC for nearly three years, never beating, "Let's Make a Deal" on ABC, nor, "As the World Turns" on CBS, but performing just well enough to stay on the schedule.  Finally, new Daytime Programming head, Lin Bolen (who destroyed NBC's daytime dominance) decided "Three on a Match" looked old and tired, and replaced it, moving, "Jeopardy!" into its 1:30/12:30 time slot.  That move not only lost, "Jeopardy!'s" college and male audience over the lunch hour in the east--killing the show, but the new shows she selected to be added to the schedule failed miserably. 

Three on a Match is an American television game show created by Bob Stewart that ran on NBC from August 2, 1971 to June 28, 1974 on its daytime schedule. The host was Bill Cullen and Don Pardo ...more

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The Moneymaze is listed (or ranked) 27 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
TVscum added The Moneymaze

Nick Clooney hosted, Alan Kalter handled announcing.  Couples answered questions for the chance to get to the Maze.  The maze had six-foot tall walls, with a dozen pillars featuring flashing buttons on each side.  One spouse standing on a platform, gave directions to the other spouse running like a rat through the maze.  In the preliminary game, the maze contained prizes.  The end game contained $10,000, which was won by finding the pillars with zeros at the top (unseen by the maze runner), and the all-important 1.  If a runner found the lighted buttons on the 1 pillar, and the buttons on the four zero pillars, and escaped the maze in 60 seconds, the couple won $10,000.  If the runner found the 1 plus three zero pillars, and escaped, the couple won $1,000.  If the runner found four zero pillars but failed to find the 1 pillar, the couple won nothing. 

The show failed, due to a lousy 4/3central time slot, but while the ratings were passable, the cost to assemble the maze and the rest of the set, produce five episodes, and strike the set, required three days of studio rental--way too expensive for the middling ratings. 

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Jackpot is listed (or ranked) 28 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
Jackpot Don Pardo, Geoff Edwards Jackpot.is a television game show produced by Bob Stewart which saw contestants attempting to solve riddles in order to win cash and prizes. Jackpot made its debut on the NBC television network ...more

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The Big Showdown is listed (or ranked) 29 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
TVscum added The Big Showdown Jim Peck

Jim Peck hosted, Dan Daniel announced and Heather Cunningham handled the dice.  This hard quiz had three players answering questions from categories linked to the numbers on a die--category one was worth one point, category two worth two points, etc.  Players attempted to gather points to hit a "Payoff Point" worth $25 to $500 (determined by a spining wheel), but could not go over the Payoff point.  So, if the leader had six points with a Payoff Point of eight, an opponent with three points,and in control of the category board might select a category with three, four or five points attached.  Once a player hit the point, a new higher Payoff Point was established, a new dollar value set and play continued.  After a pre-determined time, a 90-second speed round was played with the two highest scoring players advancing to "Final Showdown", and the lowest scorer eliminated.

"Final Showdown" had the two highest scoring players answering questions from three categories worth one, two or three points, attempting to hit a Payoff Point of 7.  Play continued as before, until one player hit 7 points exactly.  That player collected an extra $250 and advanced to roll the dice for $10,000. 

The bonus round featured big dice with the numbers 1-5 and six replaced by "Show" on one die, and "Down" on the other.  The player had one roll to hit "Show" and "Down" to win $10,000.  Failing that, the number rolled became the Payoff Point, and the player now has the chance to roll the dice as many times as possible in 30 seconds, trying to hit "Show" and "Down" for $5,000.  Rolling the Payoff Point nets $250 each time it is hit, and adds an extra five seconds of additional time, if needed. 

Sadly, "The Big Showdown" aired for only six months in late 1974 into 1975.  It deserved a much longer run. 

The Big Showdown is an American game show that aired on the ABC television network from December 23, 1974 to July 4, 1975. Jim Peck hosted the program and Dan Daniel served as announcer. Two ...more

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Split Second is listed (or ranked) 30 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
Split Second Split Second is an American television game show which originally aired on ABC from March 20, 1972, to June 27, 1975. The show returned on December 15, 1986 in syndication in the United States ...more

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Make me Laugh (Syndication) is listed (or ranked) 31 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
Make me Laugh (Syndication) Make Me Laugh (syndication) was a syndicated game show that was on from 1979 to 1980. It was hosted by Bobby Van.

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Now You See It is listed (or ranked) 32 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
Now You See It Chuck Henry, Jack Narz Now You See It is an American television game show created by Frank Wayne for Mark Goodson-Bill Todman Productions. Two seasons were produced, and both aired on CBS. The first series ran from ...more

The Best 1970s CBS Comedy Shows

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Shoot for the Stars is listed (or ranked) 33 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
TVscum added Shoot for the Stars

Geoff Edwards hosted, alongside announcer Bob Clayton. Two teams, each with a celebrity and civilian player competed in the game.  Each team was staked with $100, and team one selected one of 24 spaces on the game board concealing a dollar amount from $100 to $300, one worth $500, one which would double the team's score, and four "Star" cards--which allowed the team to wager any and all of their accumulated winnings on a question.  The "questions" were oddly-worded phrases in two parts, for example:  Navy-colored/Gouda would challenge the celebrity to say, "Blue" and the civilian to say, "Cheese".  The first team to reach $1500, won the game, and played the end game.

The end game required the civilian to describe two word phrases, one word at a time ("An animal who says, 'Bow wow' and the structure in which you live" would result in, "Dog House")  The civilian would hit a plunger to select a random number from five to nine, to determine the number of correct answers required to win the bonus money.  The bonus cash started at $1000 and increased $500 each time the bonus was not won. 

This was a reasonably entertaining Bob Stewart show, spoiled by a bonus round with a chintzy prize--making for a rather unexciting finale.  Shoot for The Stars was the last NBC game show to originate from New York City, until "Million Second Quiz" in 2013. 

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Second Chance is listed (or ranked) 34 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
TVscum added Second Chance

Jim Peck hosted this early version of "Press Your Luck".  Jack Clark handled announcing duties.

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The $1.98 Beauty Show is listed (or ranked) 35 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
The $1.98 Beauty Show Rosey Grier, Jamie Farr, Marty Allen The $1.98 Beauty Show is an American game show that aired in syndication from September 1978 to September 1980. Hosted by Rip Taylor, the series is a parody of beauty contests, and featured six ...more

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Whew! is listed (or ranked) 36 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
TVscum added Whew! Tom Kennedy

Tom Kennedy hosted this screamingly fast game.  Rod Roddy was the show's announcer.  Two civilians compted in as many as three rounds--one the blocker, one the charger.  The charges is sequestered offstage, while the blocker places six blocks on the game board, consisting of five rows of blooper-style questions ranging horizontally from $10 to $50, and a sixth row with three questions of $200, $350 and $500.  No more than three blocks could be placed on a single row, and only one, if desired placed on the sixth row.  The charger returns to correct at least one blooper on each row in 60 seconds.  The charger calls a row and dollar amount to reveal the blooper to be answered.  A correct answer, and the player moves the the next row and selection of a dollar amount.  An incorrect solution to the blooper and the player must select another dollar amount/question from the same row, and play from that row until a correct solution is provided.  If the player correctly solves a blooper on all six rows, he/she wins the round, and becomes the blocker in the next round.  THE TWISTS:  If a player hits a block placed by his/her opponent, that player suffers a 5-second time penalty, and cannot select another question for five seconds.  If a player's time is running short, and scaling to the top tier looks unlikely, the player can call, "Long Shot", which stops the clock, and takes the player immediately to the sixth row on the game board.  The penalty for the Long Shot--the opponent gets to secretly place a block on that sixth row of three bloopers, which may include a previously-placed block.  If the player hits a block, the opponent wins the round and becomes the charger.  If the player finds the remaining blooper, and solves it correctly, he/she wins the round and becomes the blocker in round two.  The player who wins two rounds wins the game and faces the "Gauntlet of Villains" for $25,000.

The "Gauntlet" consistes of ten distinct "Villains", each blocking the player's progress, until a blooper is correctly solved.  The player has 60 seconds of base time to play, plus one additional second for every $100 won in the preliminary game.  So, if a player won $800 in the preliminary game, he/she would have a total of 68 seconds to win $25,000.  If the player can get past ten villains, in the allotted time (regardless of how many bloopers are attempted), the player wins $25,000.  If time runs out before ten correct solutions are provided, the player receives $100 for each correct answer. 

Midway through its run, "Whew!" became, "Celebrity Whew!" which paired contestants with celebrities, who alternated answering questions.  Even with the bad idea of adding celebrities, "Whew!" was a remarkably fun game to watch with its challenging questions and breakneck pace, and with a better time slot, would have continued well beyond its 13-month run.

Whew! is an American game show that aired on CBS from April 23, 1979, until May 30, 1980. It was hosted by Tom Kennedy and announced by Rod Roddy. The game was created by Jay Wolpert. Production ...more

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Musical Chairs is listed (or ranked) 37 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
TVscum added Musical Chairs Adam Wade Musical Chairs is a game show that aired from June 16 to October 31, 1975 on CBS. Singer Adam Wade hosted, making him the first African-American game show host. Wade was pedigreed, having had ...more

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50 Grand Slam is listed (or ranked) 38 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
TVscum added 50 Grand Slam Tom Kennedy

Kennedy hosted, John Harlan was the announcer.  This was an attempt to bring back the big-money quizzes of the 1950s, with two players facing off in dual isolation booths, playing a particular subject, involving multi-part questions.  The winner of the first game, won $200, and could face a new challenger on the same subject the next day for $500, increasing the winnings for each successful game ($200, 500, 1000, 2000, 5000, 10,000, 20,000) all the way to $50,000 for eight wins.  A player risked all winnings in order to continue playing.   In its 13-week run, five players completed the $50,000 question.  A reasonably good show, flawed by the prize structure which had too many $200 v. $500 games.  Kennedy, as usual, was brilliant.

50 Grand Slam is a game show from Ralph Andrews Productions that aired on NBC from October 4 to December 31, 1976. Tom Kennedy hosted the show, with John Harlan as the announcer. It premiered ...more

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The Magnificent Marble Machine is listed (or ranked) 39 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
TVscum added The Magnificent Marble Machine Art James

Johnny Gilbert

The Magnificent Marble Machine is an American television game show that featured a giant pinball machine as its centerpiece. The program premiered on NBC on July 7, 1975 at 12:00 pm ET, ...more

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Winning Streak is listed (or ranked) 40 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
TVscum added Winning Streak Bill Cullen

Bill Cullen hosted, Don Pardo announced.  In the first round, a category was displayed from which players had to form words, by answering questions beginning with letters posted on the display board.  For example, if an "E" was selected, the question might read:  This automobile named after a member of the Ford family, is considered one of the greatest failures of the auto industry.--Answer: Edsel.  The player answering correctly, could place that "E" in a display on his/her podium, to begin spelling eggs, or place it at the end of the display to spell waffle.  The first player to complete a word with four or more letters won the game and played the Money Board.  Here, the contestant selected a number 1-6 which concealed a dollar amount from $100 to $250.  If $250 was selected, that amount was doubled for each letter added to a word the contestant started building.  A two-letter word was worth $500, a three-letter word was worth $1000, and a 10-letter word was worth $128,000.  No one ever reached that level, because a player could quit at any time, since an illegal word, not found in the dictionary, lost everything.  A second round was played, with the two winners combining their Money Board winnings, and a final head-to-head word-building round winner took all of the cash.  Not Bob Stewart's ($10,000 Pyramid) finest creation.

Winning Streak is an American television game show hosted by Bill Cullen and announced by Don Pardo. It aired daily on NBC from July 1, 1974 to January 3, 1975 and was produced at the NBC ...more

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Blank Check is listed (or ranked) 41 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
TVscum added Blank Check Art James, Johnny Jacobs

A game of E-S-P, sort of.  Six players competed for an entire week of shows, each, trying to fill in a four-digit check.

One contestant was the "check writer" and faced the five other players. That contestant hit a plunger that stopped five spinning numbers, which could be used to write the check, ranging from 1-9. Host James asked the other five contestants, seated in a gallery at stage right, a question requiring a response containing a common relation between two things. The contestant who rang in with the correct answer attempted to guess what number (from the five spun at the start of the game) the check writer chose as the last digit in their check. Guessing correctly meant they switched places with the check writer and started a new check for themselves, and the check writer won the amount for which the check had been completed up to that point.  If the check writer successfully stumped three players, he/she played an audience match, which could knock him/her out of the check writing spot.  However, if the audience match was successful, the checkwriter faced one more contestant trying to guess the fourth and final number (the thousands number), if the opposing contestant failed to guess which number the checkwriter placed in the final spot, the checkwriter won the check worth the full amount of his/her check--anywhere from $1,234 to $9,876.  The writer of the largest check of the week, also received an automobile. 

Art James was great as usual, but had little to work with on this dud. 

Blank Check is an American game show that aired on NBC from January 6 to July 4, 1975. It was promoted as "television's first ESP game". Art James was host, with Johnny Jacobs as ...more

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Rhyme and Reason is listed (or ranked) 42 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
Rhyme and Reason Bob Eubanks Rhyme and Reason is an American television game show that aired on ABC from July 7, 1975 through July 9, 1976. Bob Eubanks hosted the show, with Johnny Jacobs serving as announcer.

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Blankety Blanks is listed (or ranked) 43 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
TVscum added Blankety Blanks Bob Clayton, Bill Cullen

Blankety Blanks paired celebrity/civilian teams against each other, to fill in blanks (the sailor threw aces, kings and queens on the floor, because he wanted a _______ __ ______ (Deck of Cards)) to puzzles.  Puzzles, dollar values and puzzles were selected by a spinning wheel containing programmed cards.  A correct answer won the team the chance to try to solve a larger puzzle, which if solved, won the civilian the cash banked.  Nice game, awful time slot against, "The Price is Right."

Blankety Blanks is an American game show that aired on ABC from April 21 to June 27, 1975. This Bob Stewart Production starred Bill Cullen as its host with Bob Clayton announcing.

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Hollywood's Talking is listed (or ranked) 44 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
TVscum added Hollywood's Talking

Geoff Edwards, Johnny Jacobs

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Break the Bank is listed (or ranked) 45 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
Break the Bank Tom Kennedy Break the Bank is an American game show created by Jack Barry and Dan Enright and produced by their production company Barry & Enright Productions. It was the first game show produced by ...more

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Dealer's Choice is listed (or ranked) 46 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
Dealer's Choice Bob Hastings Dealer' s Choice is an American game show that aired from January 21, 1974 to December 12, 1975 in syndication for a total of 210 episodes. Bob Hastings was the host for the first few weeks; ...more

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The Diamond Head Game is listed (or ranked) 47 on the list The Best Game Shows of the 1970s
The Diamond Head Game The Diamond Head Game is an American game show that aired from January 6 to July 4, 1975 in five-day-a-week syndication. Borrowing its name from a long dormant volcano on the island of Oahu, the ...more