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The Best Short Rhyming Poetry  

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List Rules Vote up the best short rhyming poems for memorization.

Not all poems have to rhyme. But the best short rhyming poems are examples of why the classic style is still so universal. These simple rhyming poems are all under 25 lines or less. 

Easy rhyming poems often sound like a song. As children, we are exposed to this kind of poetry through greats like Dr. Suess. Some of these short poems that rhyme are children’s poems, others are all about falling in love, while others center on the hardships of life. 

You will no doubt recognize a few famous poets on this roundup, like Robert Frost and Emily Dickinson. However, there are also several more obscure rhyming poems that are equally impressive and deserve to be read among the classics.

Make your voice heard. What are the best short rhyming poems? Vote up all your favorites.  

1
Life Madness

Life gets faster every day,
No time to think, no time to play.
Hurry, chaos, lots of stress,
Tension leads to sleeplessness.

When will all this madness cease?
Where is free time? Where is peace?
I'm running, doing, till I drop.
Give me buttons: Pause, Mute, STOP!

Author: Joanna Fuchs

Worth commiting to memory?
2
The Eagle

He clasps the crag with crooked hands; 
Close to the sun in lonely lands, 
Ring'd with the azure world, he stands. 

The wrinkled sea beneath him crawls; 
He watches from his mountain walls, 
And like a thunderbolt he falls. 

Author: Alfred Lord Tennyson

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3
The Sick Rose

O Rose thou art sick. 
The invisible worm, 
That flies in the night 
In the howling storm: 

Has found out thy bed 
Of crimson joy: 
And his dark secret love 
Does thy life destroy.

Author: William Blake

Worth commiting to memory?
4
Nothing Gold Can Stay

Nature’s first green is gold,
Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf’s a flower;
But only so an hour.
Then leaf subsides to leaf.
So Eden sank to grief,
So dawn goes down to day.
Nothing gold can stay.

Author: Robert Frost

Worth commiting to memory?