bridges Bridges in District of Columbia

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A complete list of bridges in District of Columbia with pictures. Famous DC bridges, the biggest and the highest. From the earliest arch and beam bridges to the newest suspension and truss bridges, this list has them all. We build bridges to span obstacles, be it a valley, waterway, or another road. A bridge's function designates its design. A bridge can can be temporary, or it can last for millennia. Many Roman bridges are still standing (and even in use) today. No surprise then that bridges often become iconic landmarks for their region.
11th Street Bridges is listed (or ranked) 1 on the list Bridges in District of Columbia
Photo: Freebase/CC-BY

The 11th Street Bridges are a complex of three bridges across the Anacostia River in Washington, D.C., United States. The bridges convey Interstate 695 across the Anacostia to its southern terminus at Interstate 295 and DC 295. The bridges also connect the neighborhood of Anacostia with the rest of the city of Washington. The first bridge at the site, constructed about 1800, played a role in the War of 1812. It burned in 1846, but was repaired. A second bridge was constructed in 1873, and replaced in 1907. A modern, four-lane bridge replaced the older bridge in 1965, and a second four-lane bridge added in 1970. In 2009, construction began on three spans to replace the 1965 and 1970 bridges. ...more

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14th Street Bridge is listed (or ranked) 2 on the list Bridges in District of Columbia
Photo: Freebase/GNU Free Documentation License

The 14th Street Bridge is a complex of five bridges across the Potomac River, connecting Arlington, Virginia, with Washington, D.C. A major gateway for automotive and rail traffic, the complex is named for 14th Street, which feeds into it on the D.C. end. It includes three four-lane automobile bridges—one northbound, one southbound, and one bi-directional — that carry Interstate 395 and U.S. Route 1 traffic. One rail bridge carries the Yellow Line of the Washington Metro; the other, the only mainline rail crossing of the Potomac River in Virginia, carries a CSX Transportation rail line. At the north end of the bridge, in East Potomac Park, the three roadways feed into a pair of two-way ...more

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Arlington Memorial Bridge is listed (or ranked) 3 on the list Bridges in District of Columbia
Photo: Freebase/CC-BY-SA-2.0

The Arlington Memorial Bridge is a Neoclassical masonry, steel, and stone arch bridge with a central bascule that crosses the Potomac River at Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. First proposed in 1886, the bridge went unbuilt for decades thanks to political quarrels over whether the bridge should be a memorial, and to whom or what. Traffic problems associated with the dedication of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in November 1921 and the desire to build a bridge in time for the bicentennial of the birth of George Washington led to its construction in 1932. Designed by the architectural firm McKim, Mead, and White, Arlington Memorial Bridge defines the western end of the ...more

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Boulder Bridge and Ross Drive ... is listed (or ranked) 4 on the list Bridges in District of Columbia
Photo: Freebase/Public domain
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Boulder Bridge and Ross Drive Bridge


Boulder Bridge and Ross Drive Bridge are historic bridges located in the Washington, D.C. portion of Rock Creek Park, an urban national park listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Boulder Bridge was constructed in 1902 and carries Beach Drive across Rock Creek, a tributary of the Potomac River. The reinforced concrete arch bridge was designed by architect W. J. Douglas and was built at a cost of $17,636. Ross Drive Bridge was originally constructed as a timber bridge in 1903 to carry Ross Drive over a tributary ravine of Rock Creek. The bridge was rebuilt in 1907 with a 168-foot span. It was designed and constructed by the United States Army Corps of Engineers. Boulder Bridge ...more