Films Scored By Ennio Morricone

List of movies with music composed by Ennio Morricone, listed alphabetically with trailers of the movies when available. This list includes any film scores composed by Ennio Morricone, ranging from smaller indie movies to larger blockbuster pictures. Film composers are responsible for writing and composing the music that plays during the movie, which is particularly important for dramas and adventure movies- imagine what Lord of the Rings would have sounded like without an amazing score.

Useful bits of trivia are can be found below, such as who directed each film scored by Ennio Morricone and when the movie was first released. Ennio Morricone is a world renowned film composer, so if you're a music buff use this list to find the names of Ennio Morricone soundtracks that you haven't heard before. Ennio Morricone died July 6th, 2020 at the Università Campus Bio-Medico in Rome as a result of injuries sustained during a fall

With movies ranging from The Good, the Bad and the Ugly to The Thing, this is a great starting point for a list of your favorites.

This Ennio Morricone films list can help answer the question, "Which movies were scored by Ennio Morricone?"

Ranked by
  • 1870
    Marcello Mastroianni, Anna Magnani, Mario Carotenuto
    • Released: 1971
    • Directed by: Alfredo Giannetti
    1870 is a 1971 Italian drama film directed by Alfredo Giannetti.
  • 1900
    Robert De Niro, Gérard Depardieu, Dominique Sanda
    • Released: 1976
    • Directed by: Bernardo Bertolucci
    This expansive period drama follows two childhood friends in northern Italy during the early 20th century. Alfredo Berlinghieri (Robert De Niro) and Olmo Dalcò (Gérard Depardieu) grow up as close companions despite their class differences. However, they drift apart as adults, Alfredo embracing his landowning heritage and Olmo championing workers' rights. As the years go by, they see the rise of fascism in their country, and eventually their values find them directly in conflict.

    Available On:

    subscription

  • A Crime
    Harvey Keitel, Emmanuelle Béart, Norman Reedus
    • Released: 2006
    • Directed by: Manuel Pradal
    Returning home from work, blue-collar New Yorker Vincent (Norman Reedus) unwittingly stumbles onto the crime scene of his murdered wife. Three years later, he is still inconsolable -- so much so that he is utterly oblivious to his neighbor, Alice (Emmanuelle Béart), and her obsessive affection for him. Wishing to force closure and bring an end to his vigilante murder investigation, Alice uses her allure to snare Roger (Harvey Keitel), a lonely cab driver and the perfect patsy.

    Available On:

    subscription

    free

  • A Dangerous Toy
    Nino Manfredi, Marlène Jobert, Mario Brega
    • Released: 1979
    • Directed by: Giuliano Montaldo
    Il giocattolo is a 1979 film directed by Giuliano Montaldo.
  • A Fistful of Dollars
    Clint Eastwood, Gian Maria Volonté, Aldo Sambrell
    • Released: 1964
    • Directed by: Sergio Leone
    A Fistful of Dollars, titled on-screen as Fistful of Dollars, is a 1964 spaghetti western film directed by Sergio Leone and starring Clint Eastwood, alongside Gian Maria Volonté, Marianne Koch, Wolfgang Lukschy, Sieghardt Rupp, José Calvo, Antonio Prieto, and Joseph Egger. A Fistful of Dollars was filmed on a low budget, and Eastwood was paid $15,000 for his role. Released in Italy in 1964 and then in the United States in 1967, it initiated the popularity of the spaghetti western film genre. It was followed by For a Few Dollars More and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, also starring Eastwood. Collectively, the films are known as the "Dollars Trilogy", or "The Man With No Name Trilogy". The film has been identified as an unofficial remake of the Akira Kurosawa film Yojimbo, which resulted in a successful lawsuit by Toho. In the United States, the United Artists publicity campaign referred to Eastwood's character in all three films as the "Man with No Name". As few spaghetti westerns had yet been released in the United States, many of the European cast and crew took on American-sounding stage names. These included Leone himself, Gian Maria Volonté, and composer Ennio Morricone.

    Available On:

  • A Genius, Two Partners and a Dupe
    Terence Hill, Miou-Miou, Robert Charlebois
    • Released: 1975
    • Directed by: Damiano Damiani, Sergio Leone
    Joe Thanks (Terence Hill) plots to steal a fortune in cash from Maj. Cabot (Patrick McGoohan), a corrupt cavalry officer.

    Available On:

    free