Famous Judges from England

List of notable or famous judges from England, with bios and photos, including the top judges born in England and even some popular judges who immigrated to England. If you're trying to find out the names of famous English judges then this list is the perfect resource for you. These judges are among the most prominent in their field, and information about each well-known judge from England is included when available.

List features Adrian Fulford, Julius Caesar and more people.

This historic judges from England list can help answer the questions "Who are some English judges of note?" and "Who are the most famous judges from England?" These prominent judges of England may or may not be currently alive, but what they all have in common is that they're all respected English judges.

Use this list of renowned English judges to discover some new judges that you aren't familiar with. Don't forget to share this list by clicking one of the social media icons at the top or bottom of the page. {#nodes}
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  • Julius Caesar
    Dec. at 56 (99 BC-43 BC)
    • Birthplace: Rome, Italy
    Gaius Julius Caesar (12 July 100 BC – 15 March 44 BC) was a Roman general and statesman who played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire. In 60 BC, Caesar, Crassus and Pompey formed the First Triumvirate, a political alliance that dominated Roman politics for several years. After assuming control of government, Caesar began a program of social and governmental reforms, including the creation of the Julian calendar. Caesar was an accomplished author and historian as well as a statesman; much of his life is known from his own accounts of his military campaigns. Caesar is considered by many historians to be one of the greatest military commanders in history. He has frequently appeared in literary and artistic works, and his political philosophy, known as Caesarism, inspired politicians into the modern era.
  • Alex James
    Age: 54
    • Birthplace: Boscombe, United Kingdom
    Steven Alexander James, FRSA (born 21 November 1968) is an English musician and songwriter, as well as a journalist and cheesemaker. Best known as the bassist of the band Blur, he has also played with temporary bands Fat Les, Me Me Me, WigWam and Bad Lieutenant.
  • Sir Adrian Bruce Fulford (born 8 January 1953), styled The Rt Hon. Lord Justice Fulford, is a Lord Justice of Appeal and as of 3 March 2017 holds the position of Investigatory Powers Commissioner.Previously, he was a judge of the International Criminal Court in The Hague from 2003–12, the Senior Presiding Judge for England and Wales from January 2016 to March 2017, and former member of the National Council for Civil Liberties (NCCL).
  • William Blackstone
    Dec. at 56 (1723-1780)
    • Birthplace: City of London, London, England
    Sir William Blackstone (10 July 1723 – 14 February 1780) was an English jurist, judge and Tory politician of the eighteenth century. He is most noted for writing the Commentaries on the Laws of England. Born into a middle-class family in London, Blackstone was educated at Charterhouse School before matriculating at Pembroke College, Oxford in 1738. After switching to and completing a Bachelor of Civil Law degree, he was made a Fellow of All Souls, Oxford on 2 November 1743, admitted to Middle Temple, and called to the Bar there in 1746. Following a slow start to his career as a barrister, Blackstone became heavily involved in university administration, becoming accountant, treasurer and bursar on 28 November 1746 and Senior Bursar in 1750. Blackstone is considered responsible for completing the Codrington Library and Warton Building, and simplifying the complex accounting system used by the college. On 3 July 1753 he formally gave up his practice as a barrister and instead embarked on a series of lectures on English law, the first of their kind. These were massively successful, earning him a total of £453 (£69,000 in 2019 terms), and led to the publication of An Analysis of the Laws of England in 1756, which repeatedly sold out and was used to preface his later works. On 20 October 1758 Blackstone was confirmed as the first Vinerian Professor of English Law, immediately embarking on another series of lectures and publishing a similarly successful second treatise, titled A Discourse on the Study of the Law. With his growing fame, Blackstone successfully returned to the bar and maintained a good practice, also securing election as Tory Member of Parliament for the rotten borough of Hindon on 30 March 1761. In November 1765 he published the first of four volumes of Commentaries on the Laws of England, considered his magnum opus; the completed work earned Blackstone £14,000 (£1,912,000 in 2019 terms). After repeated failures, he successfully gained appointment to the judiciary as a Justice of the Court of King's Bench on 16 February 1770, leaving to replace Edward Clive as a Justice of the Common Pleas on 25 June. He remained in this position until his death, on 14 February 1780. Blackstone's legacy and main work of note is his Commentaries. Designed to provide a complete overview of English law, the four-volume treatise was repeatedly republished in 1770, 1773, 1774, 1775, 1778 and in a posthumous edition in 1783. Reprints of the first edition, intended for practical use rather than antiquary interest, were published until the 1870s in England and Wales, and a working version by Henry John Stephen, first published in 1841, was reprinted until after the Second World War. Legal education in England had stalled; Blackstone's work gave the law "at least a veneer of scholarly respectability". William Searle Holdsworth, one of Blackstone's successors as Vinerian Professor, argued that "If the Commentaries had not been written when they were written, I think it very doubtful that the United States, and other English speaking countries would have so universally adopted the common law." In the United States, the Commentaries influenced Alexander Hamilton, John Marshall, James Wilson, John Jay, John Adams, James Kent and Abraham Lincoln, and remain frequently cited in Supreme Court decisions.
    • Birthplace: United Kingdom
    Donald James Nicholls, Baron Nicholls of Birkenhead, PC (born 25 January 1933), is a British lawyer and retired Law Lord (Lord of Appeal in Ordinary).
    • Birthplace: Yorkshire, England
    Brenda Marjorie Hale, Baroness Hale of Richmond, , known as Lady Hale (born 31 January 1945) is a British judge and the current President of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom. In 2004, she joined the House of Lords as a Lord of Appeal in Ordinary. She is the only woman to have been appointed to this position. She served as a Law Lord until 2009 when she, along with the other Law Lords, transferred to the new Supreme Court. She served as Deputy President of the Supreme Court from 2013 to 2017. On 5 September 2017, Hale was appointed as President of the Supreme Court, and was sworn in on 2 October 2017. She is the third person and first woman to serve the role, which was established in 2009. Hale is one of three women to have been appointed to the Supreme Court (alongside Lady Black and Lady Arden). Since July 30 2018, Hale has been a non-permanent judge of the Court of Final Appeal of Hong Kong. Alongside Beverley McLachlin, she is the first woman to serve in that court. Hale is Honorary President of the Cambridge University Law Society.