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List Rules Famous People Who Died of Larynx Cancer

List of famous people who died of larynx cancer, including photos, birthdates, professions, and other information. These celebrities who died by cancer of the larynx are listed alphabetically and include the famous larynx cancer victims’ hometown and biographical info about them when available. List features people like Evan Hunter and Suchart Chaovisith. These notable cancer of the larynx deaths include modern and long-gone famous men and women, from politicians to religious leaders to writers. Everyone on this list has larynx cancer as a cause of death somewhere in their public records, even if it was just one contributing factor for their death. (9 People)
Aldous Huxley is listed (or ranked) 1 on the list Famous People Who Died of Larynx Cancer
Photo:  Hulton Deutsch/Getty Images

Aldous Leonard Huxley was an English writer, philosopher and a prominent member of the Huxley family. He was best known for his novels including Brave New World, set in a dystopian London, and for non-fiction books, such as The Doors of Perception, which recalls experiences when taking a psychedelic drug, and a wide-ranging output of essays. Early in his career Huxley edited the magazine Oxford Poetry, and published short stories and poetry. Mid career and later, he published travel writing, film stories and scripts. He spent the later part of his life in the US, living in Los Angeles from 1937 until his death. In 1962, a year before his death, he was elected Companion of Literature by the ...more on Wikipedia

Age: Died at 69 (1894-1963)

Birthplace: Godalming, United Kingdom

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Evan Hunter is listed (or ranked) 2 on the list Famous People Who Died of Larynx Cancer
Photo: Freebase/GNU Free Documentation License

Ed McBain was an American author and screenwriter. Born Salvatore Albert Lombino, he legally adopted the name Evan Hunter in 1952. While successful and well known as Evan Hunter, he was even better known as Ed McBain, a name he used for most of his crime fiction, beginning in 1956. ...more on Wikipedia

Age: Died at 79 (1926-2005)

Birthplace: New York City, New York, United States of America

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Quincy Howe was an American journalist, best known for his CBS radio broadcasts during World War II. He was the son of Mark Anthony De Wolfe Howe. Howe served as director of the American Civil Liberties Union before the Second World War, and as chief editor at Simon & Schuster from 1935 to 1942. He left CBS in 1947 to join ABC. In the fall of 1955, he hosted four episodes of the 26-week prime time series Medical Horizons on ABC before he was replaced in that capacity by Don Goddard. Howe moderated the fourth and final Kennedy/Nixon debate on October 21, 1960. Howe retired from broadcasting in 1974. He died from cancer of the larynx. ...more on Wikipedia

Age: Died at 77 (1900-1977)

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Mary Wells is listed (or ranked) 4 on the list Famous People Who Died of Larynx Cancer
Photo: Freebase/Fair use

Mary Esther Wells was an American singer who helped to define the emerging sound of Motown in the early 1960s. Along with the Supremes, the Miracles, the Temptations, and the Four Tops, Wells was said to have been part of the charge in black music onto radio stations and record shelves of mainstream America, "bridging the color lines in music at the time." With a string of hit singles composed mainly by Smokey Robinson, including "The One Who Really Loves You"", "Two Lovers", the Grammy-nominated "You Beat Me to the Punch" and her signature hit, "My Guy", she became recognized as "The Queen of Motown" until her departure from the company in 1964, at the height of her popularity. She was one ...more on Wikipedia

Age: Died at 49 (1943-1992)

Birthplace: Detroit, Michigan, United States of America

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