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Famous People Who Died of Killed In Action

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List RulesFamous People Who Died of Killed In Action

List of famous people who died of killed in action, including photos, birthdates, professions, and other information. These celebrities who died by killed in action are listed alphabetically and include the famous KIA victims’ hometown and biographical info about them when available. The list you're viewing has a variety of people, like Alexander Hays and Jedh Colby Barker, in it. These notable KIA deaths include modern and long-gone famous men and women, from politicians to religious leaders to writers. Everyone on this list has killed in action as a cause of death somewhere in their public records, even if it was just one contributing factor for their death. (78 People)
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    Muammar Mohammed Abu Minyar Gaddafi (; c. 1942 – 20 October 2011), commonly known as Colonel Gaddafi, was a Libyan revolutionary, politician, and political theorist. He governed Libya as Revolutionary Chairman of the Libyan Arab Republic from 1969 to 1977, and then as the "Brotherly Leader" of the Great Socialist People's Libyan Arab Jamahiriya from 1977 to 2011. He was initially ideologically committed to Arab nationalism and Arab socialism but later ruled according to his own Third International Theory. Born near Sirte, Italian Libya to a poor Bedouin family, Gaddafi became an Arab nationalist while at school in Sabha, later enrolling in the Royal Military Academy, Benghazi. Within the...  more

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      #1333 of 1,355 The Greatest Minds of All Time#1022 of 2,443 The Most Influential People of All Time#585 of 753 People We Wish Were Still Alive

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      Joseph Patrick Kennedy Jr. (July 25, 1915 – August 12, 1944) was a United States Navy lieutenant. He was killed in action during World War II while serving as a land-based patrol bomber pilot, and was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross. He was the eldest of nine children born to Joseph P. Kennedy Sr. (1888–1969) and Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy (1890–1995). He was the only Kennedy son who never sought political office, though he had planned to. His three younger brothers attained distinguished political positions: John F. Kennedy (1917–1963) served as a U.S. Senator from Massachusetts and as U.S. President, Robert F. Kennedy (1925–1968) served as U.S. Attorney General and as a U.S. Senator from...  more
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        Wilfred Edward Salter Owen, MC (18 March 1893 – 4 November 1918) was an English poet and soldier. He was one of the leading poets of the First World War. His war poetry on the horrors of trenches and gas warfare was heavily influenced by his mentor Siegfried Sassoon, and stood in stark contrast both to the public perception of war at the time and to the confidently patriotic verse written by earlier war poets such as Rupert Brooke. Among his best-known works – most of which were published posthumously – are "Dulce et Decorum est", "Insensibility", "Anthem for Doomed Youth", "Futility", "Spring Offensive" and "Strange Meeting"....  more

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          #52 of 250 The Best Gay Authors#22 of 111 The Best English Poets of All Time#31 of 179 The Best Poets of the 20th Century

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          Henry Gwyn Jeffreys Moseley (; 23 November 1887 – 10 August 1915) was an English physicist, whose contribution to the science of physics was the justification from physical laws of the previous empirical and chemical concept of the atomic number. This stemmed from his development of Moseley's law in X-ray spectra. Moseley's law advanced atomic physics, nuclear physics and quantum physics by providing the first experimental evidence in favour of Niels Bohr's theory, aside from the hydrogen atom spectrum which the Bohr theory was designed to reproduce. That theory refined Ernest Rutherford's and Antonius van den Broek's model, which proposed that the atom contains in its nucleus a number of...  more