Famous Racecar Drivers from Scotland

List of notable or famous racecar drivers from Scotland, with bios and photos, including the top racecar drivers born in Scotland and even some popular racecar drivers who immigrated to Scotland. If you're trying to find out the names of famous Scottish racecar drivers then this list is the perfect resource for you. These racecar drivers are among the most prominent in their field, and information about each well-known racecar driver from Scotland is included when available.

The list you're viewing has a variety of people, like Jackie Stewart and Paul di Resta, in it.

This historic racecar drivers from Scotland list can help answer the questions "Who are some Scottish racecar drivers of note?" and "Who are the most famous racecar drivers from Scotland?" These prominent racecar drivers of Scotland may or may not be currently alive, but what they all have in common is that they're all respected Scottish racecar drivers.

Use this list of renowned Scottish racecar drivers to discover some new racecar drivers that you aren't familiar with. Don't forget to share this list by clicking one of the social media icons at the top or bottom of the page. {#nodes}

  • Alister McRae

    Alister McRae (born 20 December 1970) is a British rally driver who competed in the World Rally Championship. He is the son of the five-time British Rally Champion Jimmy McRae and the younger brother of the late 1995 World Rally Champion, Colin McRae.
    • Age: Dec. at 36 (1970-2007)
    • Birthplace: Lanark, United Kingdom
  • Allan McNish

    Allan McNish (born 29 December 1969) is a British former racing driver, commentator, and journalist from Scotland. He is a three-time winner of the 24 Hours of Le Mans, most recently in 2013, as well as a three-time winner of the American Le Mans Series, which he last won in 2007. He won the FIA World Endurance Championship (FIA WEC) in 2013. He has also been a co-commentator and pundit for BBC Formula One coverage on TV, radio and online and is currently the team principal of the Audi Sport ABT Schaeffler Formula E team.
    • Age: 53
    • Birthplace: Dumfries, United Kingdom
  • Andrew Cowan

    Andrew Cowan (born 13 December 1936) is a Scottish former rally driver, and the founder and senior director of Mitsubishi Ralliart until his retirement on 30 November 2005.
    • Age: 86
  • Colin Steele McRae, (5 August 1968 – 15 September 2007) was a British rally driver from Lanark, Scotland. The son of five-time British Rally Champion Jimmy McRae and brother of rally driver Alister McRae, Colin McRae was the 1991 and 1992 British Rally Champion and, in 1995 became the first British person and the youngest to win the World Rally Championship Drivers' title, a record he still holds. McRae's outstanding performance with the Subaru World Rally Team enabled the team to win the World Rally Championship Constructors' title three times in succession in 1995, 1996 and 1997. After a four-year spell with the Ford Motor Co. team, which saw McRae win nine events, he moved to Citroën World Rally Team in 2003 where, despite not winning an event, he helped them win the first of their three consecutive manufacturers' titles. He was appointed a Member of the Order of the British Empire for services to motorsport in 1996.McRae died in 2007 when he crashed his helicopter near his home. The accident also killed his son and two family friends. In November 2008 he was posthumously inducted into the Scottish Sports Hall of Fame.
    • Age: Dec. at 39 (1968-2007)
    • Birthplace: Lanark, United Kingdom
  • George Dario Marino Franchitti, MBE (born 19 May 1973) is a British former racing driver and current motorsport commentator from Scotland. He is a four time IndyCar Series champion (2007, 2009, 2010, 2011), a three-time winner of the Indianapolis 500 (2007, 2010, 2012) as well as a winner of the 24 Hours of Daytona (2008). Franchitti started his career in his native United Kingdom in the early 1990s, competing in Formula Vauxhall and Formula Three and was also the winner of the McLaren Autosport BRDC Award in 1992. After Franchitti did not secure a single-seater drive in 1995, he was contracted by the AMG team to compete in touring cars in the DTM and its successor – the International Touring Car Championship. Despite 2 seasons with relative success, the series folded at the end of the 1996 season, again leaving Franchitti without a drive. Mercedes placed Franchitti in CART in 1997 with the Hogan Racing team. Franchitti spent 6 seasons in CART, where he won 10 races with the Team Green squad that he joined in 1998; he failed to win a championship title, with a best final position of 2nd-place in 1999, behind Juan Pablo Montoya in a tie-breaker. Team Green moved to the IndyCar Series for the 2003 campaign, with Franchitti remaining in the team. Franchitti's first season for IndyCar was disrupted by an injury, but won his first races the following season. His break-out year came in 2007, when he won the rain-shortened Indianapolis 500 as one of 4 victories in his route to a first career championship title in a final-race title decider with Scott Dixon. At the end of the season, Franchitti was named as BBC Scotland's Sports Personality of the Year. After an ill-fated move to NASCAR in 2008 (which ended after half a season) Franchitti returned to IndyCar in 2009, driving for Chip Ganassi Racing. Franchitti won on his 2nd start back in the series, and eventually took 5 wins as he won a 2nd championship, again in a final race championship decider against Dixon and Team Penske's Ryan Briscoe. He retained the title in 2010, again with a final race championship win over Penske's Will Power; Franchitti's strong form on ovals – including a 2nd Indianapolis 500 victory – allowed him to overhaul Power by 5 points at the final race. His 3rd consecutive and 4th overall title came in 2011, in which he battled Power for the championship the second time but the championship win ultimately was decided in favour of Franchitti, after the season's final race was abandoned due to a serious crash that resulted in the death of his close friend and former teammate Dan Wheldon. A new car was introduced for the 2012 season, in which Franchitti only scored 1 victory – in the Indianapolis 500 – to become the 10th driver to win at least 3 Indianapolis 500's during a career.On 6 October 2013, Franchitti was involved in a serious crash in the Grand Prix of Houston, when his car flew into catch-fencing after contact with the cars of Takuma Sato and E. J. Viso. Franchitti suffered 2 fractured vertebrae, a broken ankle, and a concussion in the crash. A month later, on 14 November, Franchitti announced his immediate retirement from motor racing on medical advice; he retired with 31 victories from 265 starts in his American open-wheel racing career, a tally which put him in a tie for ninth on the all-time wins list with former teammate Paul Tracy.After his retirement, Franchitti would become the co-commentator for Formula E's world feed broadcast.
    • Age: 50
    • Birthplace: Bathgate, United Kingdom
  • David Marshall Coulthard, (; born 27 March 1971), known as DC, is a British former Formula One racing driver turned presenter, commentator and journalist. He was runner-up in the 2001 Formula One World Drivers' Championship, driving for McLaren. Coulthard began karting at the age of eleven and achieved early success before progressing to car racing in the British Formula Ford Championship and the Formula 3000 series. He first drove in Formula One with Williams in the 1994 season succeeding the late Ayrton Senna. The following year he won his first Grand Prix in Portugal, and then for the 1996 season he moved to McLaren. After winning two races in the 1997 season, he finished 3rd in the World Drivers' Championship in the 1998 season. He won five races throughout 1999 and 2000 before finishing 2nd in the Drivers' Championship to Michael Schumacher in 2001. Two more victories followed between 2002 and 2003 before he left McLaren at the end of 2004. He moved to Red Bull in 2005 and secured their first podium a year later. Coulthard retired from Formula One racing at the end of 2008. After retiring from Formula One Coulthard continued working with Red Bull as a consultant and joined the BBC as a commentator and pundit for their coverage of Formula One. He returned to active motorsports in 2010 joining Mücke Motorsport in the Deutsche Tourenwagen Masters and retired at the end of 2012. Coulthard has also participated in the Race of Champions, finishing runner-up in the Drivers' Cup in 2008, and winning the competition in 2014 and 2018. Since 2016 he has worked as a commentator and analyst for Channel 4 after they took over the BBC's terrestrial television rights.
    • Age: 52
    • Birthplace: Twynholm, Scotland