Entertainment

The Best Movie Speeches For Women  

William Neckard
471 votes 271 voters 32.8k views 20 items

List Rules Vote up the speeches from movies that are the best monologues spoken by women to memorize for auditions and classes.

It’s not easy to craft a successful cinematic monologue. These famous female monologues are memorable because they not only hold the audience’s attention, but they also make the movie. If you’re an actress looking to impress a casting agent or director, memorizing any of these 20 female monologues for an audition is the perfect place to start.

Steel Magnolias is a weepie, designed to make its audience cry. But there is no scene, perhaps in the history of cinema, that is more tear-inducing than one that takes place in the cemetery after M’Lynn (Sally Field) buries her daughter Shelby (Julia Roberts). With compact in hand, her best friends around her, M’Lynn finally gives up trying to remain strong. She breaks down, wanting to know, “whyyyyyy,” God took her young daughter away from her.

If weepie drama isn’t your thing, there are plenty of other emotional monologues from movies, and even a few comical ones on this list as well. Speak as a prosecuting lawyer prosecuting, a fed up middle-aged woman, or even a serial killer who wants to be beautiful and famous. There are lots of great female characters out there to choose from.

Which female monologue do you think packs the biggest punch? Let us know by voting thumbs up or thumbs down.  

back to page 1
Ranker Video
Video: YouTube

This is really fascinating, what's going on at this table. Let's take you and Erica. You've been around the block a few times. What are you, around 60? 63. Fantastic! Never married, which as we know, if you were a woman, would be a curse. You'd be an old maid, a spinster. Blah, blah, blah. So instead of pitying you, they write an article about you. Celebrate your never marrying. You’re elusive and ungetable, a real catch.

Then, there’s my gorgeous sister here. Look at her. She is so accomplished. Most successful female playwright since who? Lillian Hellmann? She’s over 50, divorced, and she sits in night after night after night because available guys her age want something—forgive me, they want somebody that looks like Marin. The over-50 dating scene is geared towards men leaving older women out. And as a result, the women become more and more productive and therefore, more and more interesting. Which, in turn, makes them even less desirable because as we all know, men— especially older men— are threatened and afraid of productive, interesting women.

It is just so clear! Single older women as a demographic are about as f*cked a group as can ever exist.

Released: 2003

Screenplay by: Nancy Meyers

More Something's Gotta Give

#68 of 227 on The Best Movies for Women #8 of 15 on Movie Couples With Creepy Age Gaps #1 of 53 on The Best Movies About Older People Falling in Love, Ranked #2 of 24 on The Best Movies About a Midlife Crisis in Women

Is this a great speech for women?
see more on Something's Gotta Give
Ranker Video
Video: YouTube

I hate the way you talk to me
And the way you cut your hair
I hate the way you drive my car
I hate it when you stare


I hate your big dumb combat boots
And the way you read my mind
I hate you so much that it makes me sick
It even makes me ryhme

I hate the way you're always right
I hate it when you lie
I hate it when you make me laugh
Even worse when you make me cry

I hate the way you're not around
And the fact that you didn't call
But mostly I hate the way I don't hate you
Not even close, not even a little bit, not even at all.

Released: 1999

Screenplay by: Karen McCullah Lutz, Kirsten Smith

More 10 Things I Hate About You

#40 of 493 on The Funniest '90s Movies #40 of 410 on The Best Rainy Day Movies #6 of 810 on The Greatest Chick Flicks Ever Made #12 of 170 on The Greatest Date Movies of All Time

Is this a great speech for women?
see more on 10 Things I Hate About You
Ranker Video
Video: YouTube

Ladies and gentlemen, Mr. Paulson has told you that the testimony of Sarah Tobias is nothing. Sarah Tobias was raped, but that is nothing. She was cut and bruised and terrorized but that is nothing.

All of it happened in front of a howling crowd and that is nothing. Well, it may be nothing to Mr. Paulson but it is not nothing to Sarah Tobias and I don't believe it is nothing to you. Next Mr.Paulson tried to convince you that Kenneth Joyce was the only person in that room who knew that Sarah Tobias was being raped. The only one...

Now you watched Kenneth Joyce. How did he strike you? Did he seem especially sensitive, especially observant? Did he seem so remarkable that you immediately said to yourselves, 'Of Course! This man would notice things other people wouldn't!' Do you believe that Kenneth Joyce saw something those three men didn't see?

In all the time that Sarah Tobias was being held down on that pinball machine the others didn't know? Kenneth Joyce confessed to you that he watched a rape and did nothing! He told you that everyone in that bar behaved badly...he was right.

But no matter how immoral it may be it is not the crime of criminal solicitation to walk away from a rape, it is not the crime of criminal solicitation to silently watch a rape ...but it is the crime of criminal solicitation to induce or entreat or encourage or persuade another person to commit a rape - 'Hold her down! Stick it to her! Make her moan...'  These three men did worse than nothing. They cheered and they clapped and they rooted the others on, made sure that Sarah Tobias was raped and raped and raped... Now tell me... Is that nothing?

Released: 1988

Screenplay by: Tom Topor

More The Accused

#16 of 23 on The Very Best Courtroom Thriller Movies #23 of 44 on The Greatest Legal Dramas Ever Made #12 of 89 on The Best Courtroom Drama Movies #21 of 48 on The Best Thriller Movies of the 1980s

Is this a great speech for women?
see more on The Accused
8
Monster - Aileen Wuornos 
Ranker Video
Video: YouTube

I always wanted to be in the movies. When I was little, I thought for sure, one day, I could be a big big star. Or maybe just beautiful. Beautiful and rich like the women on TV. Yeah, I had a lot of dreams. And I guess you could call me a real romantic because I truly believed that one day, they'd come true. So I dreamed about it for hours.

As the years went by, I learned to stop sharin' this with people. They said I was dreaming, but back then, I believed it wholeheartedly. So whenever I was down, I would just escape into my mind, to my other life, where I was someone else. It made me happy to think that all these people just didn't know yet who I was gonna be. But one day, they'd all see.

I heard that Marilyn Monroe was discovered in a soda shop and I thought for sure it could be like that. So I started goin' out real young and I was always secretly lookin' for who was gonna discover me. Was it this guy? Or maybe this one? I never knew.

But even if they couldn't take me all the way, like Marilyn, they would somehow believe in me just enough. They would see me for what I could be and think I was beautiful. Like a diamond in the rough. They would take me away to my new life and my new world, where everything would be different. Yeah. I lived that way for a long, long time. In my head, dreaming like that. It was nice. And one day, it just stopped.

Is this a great speech for women?