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Weird History

There Was Once A Millipede Larger Than A Human - And It Had No Known Predators

Imagine walking through a peaceful forest and running into huge prehistoric creatures, like a dragonfly with a two-foot wingspan. Then imagine seeing the world's largest land invertebrate: an enormous, six-foot-long millipede. During the Pennsylvanian period, massive bugs roamed North America, and the largest was Arthropleura, the millipede king of the forest. Arthropleura was a stunning one-and-a-half feet wide, and it could grow to nearly seven feet in length. The largest millipede fossils ever found, including tracks from the creature, prove that Arthropleura dominated the swampy forests of North America 300 million years ago.

Just like the giant Megalodon, a 60-foot prehistoric shark, Arthropleura was much more giant than its descendants, today's millipedes. And Arthropleura dominated the Earth long before the dinosaurs, along with many other prehistoric creatures

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