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Turns Out The Original Bible Is Drastically Different From The Version You Grew Up With

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Vote up the changes to the sacred text that surprise you the most.

There has never been a book more historically debated than the Bible, especially when it comes to conversations about how and if the Bible changes over time. It’s a tome that has started wars, divided nations, and probably ended more than a few friendships, all because of the myriad ways people interpret the same core concepts in different ways. The history of the Bible is fraught with revisions, wild interpretations, and massive overhauls. Over the course of the last century, changes to the Bible have seen the book expand and retract like a 2,000-year-old accordion.

To understand why so many variations of such an important book exist, you must remember that there is no "original Bible." Rather, the text of the Old Testament existed as stories that were passed down through generations before being molded together by authors and then later edited into the book that you can may have at home today. Because the Bible had such a rocky start, scholars have multiple versions of the text to work with, each with its own interpretation of events. With that in mind, a question lingers: has the Bible changed? 

To find changes in Bible verses, one simply has to find some of the most popular sections (the Ten Commandments, the immaculate birth, etc.) and compare one Bible to a different version. It’s likely that you’ll notice something different. The biggest Bible changes happen when a church branches off from its parent and tries to set out with its own identity. Jehovah’s Witnesses and the Church of Latter Day Saints, for example, have managed to add their own bible histories to the mix, making things significantly murkier than they already were.

If, after reading about these changes, you're still feeling doubts about the reality of alterations, additions, and subtractions to the foundational theological documents, take a gander at Jesus' slow transformation into a white figure for further evidence that religious dogma and doctrine can—and do—alter with the passage of time.

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