attractions List of John C. Austin Architecture

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List of John C. Austin buildings, listed alphabetically with photos when available. Most, if not all prominent John C. Austin architecture appears on this list, including houses, churches and other structures where applicable. This list contains information like what city the structure can be found in, and when it was first opened to the public. If you want to find out even more about these famous John C. Austin buildings you can click on the building names to get additional information.

This list features Griffith Observatory, Los Angeles City Hall and more.

This list answers the questions, "What buildings did John C. Austin design?" and "What do John C. Austin structures look like?"
1

Canfield-Wright House


The Canfield-Wright House, known alternatively as Wrightland and The Pink Lady, is a historic structure in Del Mar, California. The private home was placed on the National Register of Historic Places on May 14, 2004. The house was built in 1910 for Charles A. Canfield. Canfield, alongside business partner Edward L. Doheny, became an oil tycoon after drilling the first successful oil well in Los Angeles in 1892. The two would go on to also drill the first oil well in Mexico, using the resulting asphalt to pave Mexican roads and standing as a precursor to Pemex. The partners' work became part of the basis of Upton Sinclair's Oil! and related film There Will Be Blood. Canfield convinced the ...more

City/Town: Del Mar, California, USA

Architect: John C. Austin

Created By: John C. Austin

Style: Mission Revival Style architecture

Griffith Observatory is listed (or ranked) 2 on the list List of John C. Austin Architecture
Photo: Freebase/GNU Free Documentation License

Griffith Observatory is a facility in Los Angeles, California sitting on the south-facing slope of Mount Hollywood in Los Angeles' Griffith Park. It commands a view of the Los Angeles Basin, including Downtown Los Angeles to the southeast, Hollywood to the south, and the Pacific Ocean to the southwest. The observatory is a popular tourist attraction with an extensive array of space and science-related displays. Since the observatory opened in 1935, admission has been free, in accordance with Griffith's will. ...more

City/Town: California, USA

Opened: May 14 1935

Created By: Frederick M. Ashley, John C. Austin

Style: Art Deco

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Guaranty Building is listed (or ranked) 3 on the list List of John C. Austin Architecture
Photo: Freebase/GNU Free Documentation License

Guaranty Building is a Beaux Arts office building in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California built in 1923 and designed by John C. Austin. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. The building is currently owned by the Church of Scientology. ...more

City/Town: Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, USA

Opened: Jan 01 1923

Architect: John C. Austin

Created By: John C. Austin

Style: Beaux-Arts architecture

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Hollywood Masonic Temple is listed (or ranked) 4 on the list List of John C. Austin Architecture
Photo: Freebase/GNU Free Documentation License

Hollywood Masonic Temple, now known as the El Capitan Entertainment Centre, is a building on Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, that was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985. The building, built in 1921, was designed by architect John C. Austin, also noted as the lead architect of the Griffith Observatory. The Masons operated the temple until 1982, when they sold the building after several years of declining membership. The building was then converted into a theater and nightclub, and ownership subsequently changed several times, until it was bought by the Walt Disney Company in 1998. Since 2003, the building's theater has been the home of Jimmy ...more

City/Town: Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, USA

Opened: Jan 01 1921

Architect: John C. Austin

Created By: John C. Austin

Style: Classical Revival, Neoclassical architecture

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