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11 Shout Outs to the Jungle Cruise Ride Weaved Into The 'Jungle Cruise' Movie

List RulesVote up the ride shout outs that fit best into the movie.

Spoiler Warning: This includes mild spoilers for Jungle Cruise.

If you're taking the family out to Disney's Jungle Cruise thinking it's just a cinematic version of the Disneyland ride, you'll be disappointed. 

The movie's set in South America (so no cute elephants and hippos), and it thankfully diverges in many ways to create a compelling story that includes an ancient curse, zombified conquistidors and even a German submarine that somehow navigates a shallow river. 

In the movie, Captain Frank "Skipper" Wolff (Dwayne Johnson) guides Dr. Lily Houghton (Emily Blunt) through the Amazon in search of the "tree of life" that could cure all disease - all the while dodging zombie conquistadors and, yes, that German sub.

But rest assured that writers found lots of places to shout out the Disneyland experience, right down to the silly puns.

And while Jungle Cruise has some confusing plot points and probably won't grab an Oscar any time soon, the insertion of ride elements into the narrative was relatively organic. 

So here are our favorites. Vote up the ones you felt best fit the movie itself. 

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    Dad Jokes Galore

    Anyone who has braved the Disneyland ride knows that it's pun central. The Disney "cast members" who operate the boat berate guests with groan-worthy puns about everything they are seeing out the sides of the boat. And it's gloriously groan-tastic.

    So how, you might ask, does Disney manage to insert silly puns into a $200 million movie whose humor is more Indiana Jones than old-school Vaudeville. 

    Well, that's easy.

    Dwayne Johnson's Captain Frank starts our story as a guy who leads tourists on Amazon river tours, seeming to take pleasure in boring them with his puns. He later uses the same tactic to annoy his benefactor Dr. Houghton when she charters his boat for her own quest. So there you go.

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    Jungle-tastic?
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    Trapped on a River

    The truth is that when you step in the boat at Disneyland, you're not going anywhere until you've taken in the animatronics, listened to the bad puns and probably gotten a little bit wet. 

    The movie skillfully plays on this idea that Captain Wolff (and a few other characters) are "trapped on the river" in that they are unable to travel more than a few feet from the water's edge without dire consequences. 

    Not to spoil the surprise, but we learn much about Wolff's past in the second half of the movie and why he can't leave the river. And it has something to do with that ancient curse. 

    The good news is that the Disneyland ride's curse ends when you step off the boat to go buy churros.

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    Jungle-tastic?
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    Proxima, the Tiger

    Among the animatronic creatures populating the Disneyland ride are the wonderful tigers and lions that seem to constantly lounge at the river's edge. 

    We have to believe that the inclusion of Captain Wolff's pet tiger Proxima in the Jungle Cruise movie directly relates to the ride. A pet elephant or hippo wouldn't fit on the boat, after all. 

    And while it might have been more plausible to travel with a pet monkey (monkeys are also prominently featured on the ride), the CGI-generated Proxima served a certain purpose in that Wolff employs trickery to make it look at one point as if he's saving an entire bar from a wild tiger - when in fact it's just his trained pet. 

    Like the tricks he plays on the tourists with indigenous tribes, Wolff's aptitude for deception fits his character and drives home one of the movie's ideas that things we fear might be only as dangerous as our pre-conceived notions.

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    Jungle-tastic?
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    The Company Store

    The Disneyland ride creates a narrative that you are going on a trip with the Jungle Navigation Company that somehow takes you on a river that spans continents. But just go with it. 

    The movie does a good job of employing the same idea. Wolff's supposed independence as a free spirit doing his own thing is obscured by his debts to Nemo Nemolato (Paul Giamatti), who runs the company dominating the tours on the river. Wolff can't seem to break free of his financial obligations any more than he can break free from the river itself. 

    Similarly, the ride tells us not that we're grabbing a boat and going on our own adventure - but that we're being guided by a corporation that controls river commerce and requires us to endure bad puns in order to explore the world. 

    Welcome to Disneyland.

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    Jungle-tastic?