READ
10.0k readers

The Most Famous Trade unionists

Updated December 9, 2019 10.0k views56 items
List of the most notable and famous Trade unionists in the world, with photos when available. Most prominent Trade unionists worldwide and top Trade unionists in America can be found on this list ordered by their level of prominence,. From reputable Trade unionists to the lesser known Trade unionists in history and today, these are the top Trade unionists in their field, and should answer the question "who are the most famous Trade unionists in the world?". List ranges from A. Philip Randolph to Wong Kwok Hing and more. You can use the people in this factual list to create a new list, re-rank it to fit your opinion, then publish it. (56 Items)
...more
  • Jimmy Hoffa

    James Riddle Hoffa (born February 14, 1913; disappeared July 30, 1975, later declared dead July 30, 1982) was an American labor union leader who served as the President of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters (IBT) union from 1957 until 1971. He vanished in late July 1975, at age 62. From an early age, Hoffa was a union activist and became an important regional figure with the IBT by his mid-20s. By 1952 he was national vice-president of the IBT, and was its general president between 1957 and 1971. He secured the first national agreement for teamsters' rates in 1964 with the National Master Freight Agreement. He played a major role in the growth and development of the union, which... more on Wikipedia

    More 

    Historians Don’t Actually Believe Frank Sheeran Killed Jimmy Hoffa#11 of 25 People Who Disappeared Mysteriously in 1970s#4 of 112 People Who Disappeared Mysteriously

  • Cesar Chavez (born César Estrada Chávez, locally [ˈsesaɾ esˈtɾaða ˈtʃaβes]; March 31, 1927 – April 23, 1993) was an American labor leader and Latino American civil rights activist. Along with Dolores Huerta, he co-founded the National Farm Workers Association, later renamed the United Farm Workers (UFW) union. Born in Yuma, Arizona to a Mexican American family, in early life Chavez worked as a manual laborer and spent two years in the United States Navy. Relocating to California, where he married, he got involved in the Community Service Organization (CSO), through which he helped laborers register to vote. In 1959, he became the CSO's national director, a position based in Los Angeles. In... more on Wikipedia
  • Asa Philip Randolph
    Photo: Metaweb (FB) / Public domain
    Asa Philip Randolph (April 15, 1889 – May 16, 1979) was a leader in the Civil Rights Movement, the American labor movement, and socialist political parties. In 1925, he organized and led the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, the first predominantly African-American labor union. In the early Civil Rights Movement and the Labor Movement, Randolph was a voice that would not be silenced. His continuous agitation with the support of fellow labor rights activists against unfair labor practices in relation to people of color eventually led President Franklin D. Roosevelt to issue Executive Order 8802 in 1941, banning discrimination in the defense industries during World War II. The group then... more on Wikipedia
  • Kenule Beeson "Ken" Saro-Wiwa (10 October 1941 – 10 November 1995) was a Nigerian writer, television producer, environmental activist, and winner of the Right Livelihood Award for "exemplary courage in striving non-violently for civil, economic and environmental rights" and the Goldman Environmental Prize. Saro-Wiwa was a member of the Ogoni people, an ethnic minority in Nigeria whose homeland, Ogoniland, in the Niger Delta has been targeted for crude oil extraction since the 1950s and which has suffered extreme environmental damage from decades of indiscriminate petroleum waste dumping. Initially as spokesperson, and then as president, of the Movement for the Survival of the Ogoni People... more on Wikipedia