Culture

Midwestern Slang Nobody On The Coasts Knows  

Jeff Richard
6.1k votes 529 voters 9.3k views 21 items

List Rules Midwesterners only: vote up the slang you actually use.

As they say: Midwest is best. After all, it's the central, beating-heart of a nation rich in diversity and complexity. Though the Midwest technically spans a swath of states and encompasses a mass of people, there's a pretty universal collection of regional slang that those who hail from one of the mid-section "belts" can probably identify, and that they most likely use.

Midwestern slang even makes its way into the vernacular of other US regional dialects without skipping a beat. Words and phrases from the Midwest are characteristically funny, nice to a fault, and often derivative of the area's Scandinavian immigration history. 

Ope? Hotdish? Expressway? Head to either of the coasts, and you're not likely to get a response. But in the Midwest? These simple, often literal phrases and words may be confusing at first, but for those in the know, they get straight to the point. The verbal expressions that stem from the flyover states flavor the standard of continental English - and it may surprise you which familiar slang terms originate in America's midsection.

1
For Cryin' Out Loud

Meaning: An expression of annoyance or aggravation.

Use it in a sentence: "For cryin' out loud, Marsha, get your act together!"

Do you use this?
2
Shorts Weather

Meaning: While shorts weather seems simple enough, it's not the same as in other parts of the country. Once the temperature climbs above 40 degrees in the Midwest, it's time to bare those legs.

Use it in a sentence: "I can't believe it's shorts weather already."

Do you use this?
3
Come With!

Meaning: The shorthand version of "Come with me," or to "come along."

Use it in a sentence: "We're actually on our way to Kacey's wedding right now. It's just up the street past the stop-and-go light, you wanna come with?"

Do you use this?
4
Pop

Meaning: A carbonated beverage, i.e., a soda.

Use it in a sentence: "I need to run to the Wal-Mart and pick up some pop for Stephanie's barn party."

Do you use this?