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Entertainment

12 Movie Scenes Where Actors Bled For Real

List Rules
Vote up the onscreen incidents that make you wince.

Although most movies rely on fake blood for gory special effects, there are cases in which unfortunate actors injured while filming have contributed their own blood to the final cut.

These bloody injuries are often the result of a simple accident on set. Instead of interrupting filming and bandaging their injured bodies, however, these actors choose to stay in character and see the scene through to completion. Their artistic decision lends some authenticity to the film's violence, although they do have to sacrifice their own well-being along the way.

Thankfully, most of these injuries aren't incredibly serious. Plus, the actor's blood is now immortalized on film forever. That's kind of cool (read: gross), right? 

Take a look below at the movie scenes where actors really bleed and vote up the onscreen injuries that would force you to call "Cut!" if you were in their position. 

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  • While filming a racist rant as plantation owner Calvin Candie in Django Unchained, Leonardo DiCaprio slammed his hand on a table to punctuate his angry words. Unfortunately, during one take, DiCaprio's hand slammed right into a glass. The glass immediately broke, ripping up DiCaprio's hand in the process. Although blood was pouring from his injury, DiCaprio stayed in character and finished the scene. 

    After the rant was over, DiCaprio's hand was cleaned and bandaged. He kept it that way for the rest of the film. Thankfully, his suffering paid off. Director Quentin Tarantino decided to use the bloody take in the final version of the movie. 

    • Actors: Jamie Foxx, Christoph Waltz, Leonardo DiCaprio, Samuel L. Jackson, Kerry Washington
    • Released: 2012
    • Directed by: Quentin Tarantino
  • While filming the intense whipping scene for The Passion of the Christ, a board was set up behind actor Jim Caviezel. The actors using the whips were supposed to land their blows on the board, rather than Caviezel's back. Unfortunately, the actors didn't have the best aim. One performer hit Caviezel so hard with the whip that he knocked the air out of him.

    Although Caviezel gave his coworker a piece of his mind, a few moments later he was hit again, this time opening a gash in his back. The injury was just one in a long line of injuries Caviezel suffered while filming. 

    • Actors: Jim Caviezel, Monica Bellucci, Claudia Gerini, Maia Morgenstern, Sergio Rubini
    • Released: 2004
    • Directed by: Mel Gibson
  • While tussling on a speedboat with Jack Ryan (Harrison Ford) in Patriot Games, Sean Bean's character, Sean Miller, ultimately perishes when Ryan impales him on an anchor. While Bean didn't suffer the full force of the anchor in his chest, he did contribute his own blood to the gory scene. 

    During the fight, Ford managed to hit Bean right above the eye with a boat hook. The injury required several stitches, and Bean still sports the scar over his left eye to this day. Thankfully, it only adds to his rough, rugged persona that matches the characters he often plays. 

    • Actors: Harrison Ford, Anne Archer, Patrick Bergin, Sean Bean, Thora Birch
    • Released: 1992
    • Directed by: Phillip Noyce
  • In The 40-Year-Old Virgin, Steve Carell plays nerdy electronics store employee Andy Stitzer, who is encouraged to lose his virginity by his coworkers. To prepare him for an intimate encounter, one coworker suggests that he wax his chest. Unaware of the pain involved, Andy agrees. 

    To contribute to the authenticity of the scene, Carell agreed to get his chest waxed for real. The globs of hair and resulting bald patches on Carell's chest are entirely authentic. After having his thick hair ripped haphazardly from his body, Carell's chest began to bleed where the wax strips were ripped away. Both the screams of pain and the resulting blood are entirely real, all courtesy of Carell's suffering. 

    • Actors: Steve Carell, Catherine Keener, Paul Rudd, Romany Malco, Seth Rogen
    • Released: 2005
    • Directed by: Judd Apatow