Christmas Classic Christmas Songs That Are Darker Than You Realized  

Erin McCann
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List Rules Vote up the most shockingly dark tunes.

The never-ending broadcasting of carols during November and December may be a depressing idea, but Christmas music with dark meanings can make the holidays downright bleak. Ugly sweaters and too many cookies are horrible enough, and it's a proven fact that Christmas music can be bad for you. And despite the twinkly lights and shiny things of the holiday season, there are plenty of classic Christmas songs that are darker than you thought – way darker.

Grandmothers getting flattened by flying deer and Mommy having an affair with Old Saint Nick can make for some dark Christmas songs, but listeners generally know they were written in good humor. Some of your favorite Christmas songs, on the other hand, may actually be about a massacre of children, inspired by the death of a loved one, or originally suppressed due to bigotry. You've probably been hearing these songs ever since your very first holiday, but after learning the truth about secretly creepy Christmas music, you might not feel as jolly.

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"White Christmas" holds the surprising record of being the world's best-selling single, first released by Bing Crosby only a few weeks after the attack on Pearl Harbor. The song was written by Irving Berlin for a Broadway musical that was never made, but managed to find its way into the Fred Astaire and Bing Crosby movie Holiday Inn (and its spiritual successor, White Christmas).

Since Berlin was Jewish, he didn't really celebrate the holiday. But he had developed a yearly tradition of visiting his son's grave; the child had passed away on Christmas Day when he was three weeks old. The melancholy Berlin associated with Christmas certainly came through in the song, and it became a hit after resonating with sentimental listeners during World War II.

Continuing the dark history of the song, the playing of "White Christmas" over the radio also served as code for American soldiers to evacuate Saigon during the Vietnam War.

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"Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas" has been covered by everyone from Amy Grant to Barry Manilow, but it was originally written for the 1944 movie Meet Me in Saint Louis and sung by Judy Garland. Hugh Martin was given the task of creating a song that could show the family's sadness over celebrating the last Christmas in a home they were soon moving from. With lyrics like "Have yourself a merry little Christmas / It may be your last," Martin did such a good job of writing a melancholy tune that Garland complained it was too depressing.

The lyrics were changed, but one of the song's last lines as heard in the film, "From now on, we'll have to muddle through somehow" was later altered to "Hang a shining star upon the highest bough." That was at the request of Frank Sinatra, who thought the song was still too dark. Despite the fact his more jolly version was the one that turned the song into a holiday classic, most people agree that it's the song's melancholy undertone that they really relate to.

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"Coventry Carol" Is About Children Being Brutally Murdered By A Jealous King

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Technically, "Coventry Carol" isn't a Christmas song; it was written for the Feast of the Holy Innocents that is celebrated on December 28. Regardless, it's more associated with Christmas, even though it refers to the Feast of the Holy Innocents and what it marks: the massacre of innocent children.

The story centers around the Biblical King Herod, who murdered of hundreds of children, hoping to kill the one who was supposed to become the Messiah. It's believed to have been taken from a play written sometime during the 16th century, but the actual origins are unknown. The haunting song is intended to sound like both a lullaby for the dead children and the cries of their mothers during the massacre.

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"I'll Be Home For Christmas" is one of the most sentimental holiday classics, beloved since many people can relate to the feeling of loneliness and separation during the holidays. But being away from home is taken to an entirely different level when one is physically unable to go home because they're currently fighting a war overseas.

The song was written in 1943 by Walter Kent and James Gannon to comfort families and friends separated by World War II. Bing Crosby sang its first recording, and made it into a hit that's been covered by many artists since.

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