Irving Berlin Plays List

List of Irving Berlin plays with descriptions, including any musicals by Irving Berlin, playwright. This Irving Berlin plays list includes promotional photos when available, as well as information about co-writers and Irving Berlin characters. This list of plays by Irving Berlin is listed alphabetically and includes art of the play's posters when available. List items include Call Me Madam, Annie Get Your Gun and many additional items as well. What plays did Irving Berlin write? All these, one-acts, musicals, or full-length plays are by Irving Berlin and can help you decide, "What are the best Irving Berlin plays?" {#nodes}

  • Annie Get Your Gun
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    Annie Get Your Gun is a musical with lyrics and music by Irving Berlin and a book by Dorothy Fields and her brother Herbert Fields. The story is a fictionalized version of the life of Annie Oakley (1860–1926), a sharpshooter who starred in Buffalo Bill's Wild West, and her romance with sharpshooter Frank E. Butler (1847–1926).The 1946 Broadway production was a hit, and the musical had long runs in both New York (1,147 performances) and London, spawning revivals, a 1950 film version and television versions. Songs that became hits include "There's No Business Like Show Business", "Doin' What Comes Natur'lly", "You Can't Get a Man with a Gun", "They Say It's Wonderful", and "Anything You Can ...more
    • Characters: Sitting Bull, Buffalo Bill Cody, Annie Oakley, Frank Butler, Winnie Tate
  • Music Box Revue

    Music Box Revue was a musical theatre revue staged by Hassard Short with music by Irving Berlin. Featuring contributions from a number of writers including Robert Benchley, it debuted at the Music Box Theatre in 1921, where it ran for 440 performances.
  • As Thousands Cheer

    As Thousands Cheer is a revue with a book by Moss Hart and music and lyrics by Irving Berlin, first performed in 1933. The revue contained satirical sketches and witty or poignant musical numbers, several of which became standards, including "Heat Wave", "Easter Parade" and "Harlem on my Mind". The sketches were loosely based on the news and the lives and affairs of the rich and famous, and other people of the day, such as Joan Crawford, John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Noël Coward, Josephine Baker, and Aimee Semple McPherson.
  • Call Me Madam
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    Call Me Madam is a musical with a book by Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse with music and lyrics by Irving Berlin. A satire on politics and foreign policy that spoofs America's penchant for lending billions of dollars to needy countries, it centers on Sally Adams, a well-meaning but ill-informed socialite widow who is appointed United States Ambassador to the fictional European country of Lichtenburg. While there, she charms the local gentry, especially Cosmo Constantine, while her press attaché Kenneth Gibson falls in love with Princess Maria.
    • Characters: Mrs. Sally Adams, Sebastian Sebastian, Kenneth Gibson, Henry Gibson, Senator Gallagher
  • Face the Music

    Face the Music is a musical, the first collaboration between Moss Hart (book) and Irving Berlin (music and lyrics). Face the Music opened on Broadway in 1932, and has had several subsequent regional and New York stagings. The popular song "Let's Have Another Cup of Coffee" was introduced in the musical by J. Harold Murray.
  • Louisiana Purchase
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    Louisiana Purchase

    Louisiana Purchase is a musical with music and lyrics by Irving Berlin and book by Morrie Ryskind based on a story by B. G. DeSylva. Set in New Orleans, the musical lightly satirises Louisiana Governor Huey Long and his control over Louisiana politics An honest U.S. senator travels to Louisiana to investigate corruption in the Louisiana Purchase Company; the company's lawyer attempts to divert him via the attentions of two beautiful women, but the senator maintains his integrity and ends up marrying one of them. In 1941 it was adapted for the film Louisiana Purchase directed by Irving Cummings. The show opened at the Shubert Brothers' Imperial Theatre, New York City on May 28, 1940 and ran ...more