Things You Didn't Know About Magical Identities In The Wizarding World

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Vote up the most magical details.

Within the Wizarding World are a wide variety of magical identities that wizards or magical creatures use to describe themselves. Many of these identities are based on their ancestry or species. Other times, wizards choose to identify themselves based on their skills and attributes, or designations they receive from their work. 

The Harry Potter books provide some details, but many details about magical identities you might not be aware of come from outside the main series.


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    The Metamorphmagus Gene Is Passed Down Through Families But Is Impossible To Predict

    The Metamorphmagus Gene Is Passed Down Through Families But Is Impossible To Predict
    Photo: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix / Warner Bros. Pictures

    The Metamorphmagus gene is largely dormant within families and nobody can predict which child will exhibit the powers. Tonks seemingly inherited the gene from the Black family since her father was a Muggle-born wizard, although none of the other known Black family members display Metamorphmagus abilities.

    The theory of familial genes passing down holds true when Teddy Lupin turns out to be a Metamorphmagus, as well. Like his mother, Teddy's powers manifest right after he is born.

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    Bridget Wenlock Was A Famous Arithmancer Who Discovered Magic In The Number Seven

    Bridget Wenlock Was A Famous Arithmancer Who Discovered Magic In The Number Seven
    Photo: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban / Warner Bros. Pictures

    Lord Voldemort is obsessed with the number seven because he believes it is the most powerful magical number. Voldemort's mindset comes from the studies conducted by Arithmancer Bridget Wenlock, who pioneered Arithmancy in the 13th century.

    Wenlock concluded that magic is at its most powerful when it's related to the number seven, which is proven by the fact that the majority of young witches and wizards manifest their magical powers at the age of 7.

    The Wizarding World has been shaped dramatically by Wenlock's Arithmancy related to the number seven - Hogwarts has seven core classes, seven floors, seven years of studies, and seven secret passageways. 

     

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    Metamorphmagus Genes Are Stronger Than Werewolf Genes

    Metamorphmagus Genes Are Stronger Than Werewolf Genes
    Photo: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - Part 1 / Warner Bros. Pictures

    Teddy Lupin is the only child known to be born from a union between a werewolf and a Metamorphmagus. His father, Remus, worries that the werewolf gene within him will be passed down and is convinced the baby will be a werewolf, as well.

    It turns out that the Metamorphmagus gene supersedes the werewolf gene in strength, because Teddy's magical abilities are inherited from his mother. Teddy doesn't possess the werewolf gene at all, which attests to the power that is inherent in the Metamorphmagus gene, which enables it to cancel out the werewolf gene entirely.

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    Centaurs Are Mistakenly Considered Half-Breeds When They Are Their Own Kind

    Centaurs Are Mistakenly Considered Half-Breeds When They Are Their Own Kind
    Photo: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix / Warner Bros. Pictures

    The Ministry of Magic calls anything that appears to be humanoid but not fully human a "half-breed," which is a politically incorrect term that nevertheless existed before Kingsley Shacklebolt's term as Minister for Magic.

    Centaurs despise wizardkind and consider them to be arrogant, and there's some truth to it since wizards don't recognize centaurs as their own species. In reality, centaurs don't qualify as half-breeds because they aren't descended from humans.

    Centaurs merely look like a mixture of human and horse, but they're actually their own species. Wizards have termed them as half-breeds purely based on their appearance when that's not quite accurate. 

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    Muggle-Borns Are Descendants Of Squibs Who Married Muggles

    Muggle-Borns Are Descendants Of Squibs Who Married Muggles
    Photo: Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince / Warner Bros. Pictures

    Only pure-blood families keep family trees, which makes it appear as if Muggle-borns have come out of nowhere from non-wizarding families. In reality, "Muggle-born" is a wizard-made identity because there's no such thing as a true Muggle-born.

    Muggle-borns are descendants of squibs who married into Muggle households and produced more Muggles until one of their descendants had the dormant wizarding gene activated. 

    If they look back far enough into their family history, every Muggle-born will find that they have a wizard ancestor whose children didn't inherit their magical ability. People like Hermione have at least one squib or wizard in their families and just don't know it or have the means to prove it.

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    Only Certain Legilimens Can Actually Read People's Thoughts

    Only Certain Legilimens Can Actually Read People's Thoughts
    Photo: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them / Warner Bros. Pictures

    A person can identify as a Legilimens if they have the ability to tap into someone else's mind, but very few can actually read another person's thoughts. Harry mistakenly believes Legilimency to be mind-reading, which Snape scoffs at but doesn't explain, although Snape isn't wrong.

    Certain witches and wizards are born as Legilimens and can read others' thoughts by natural inclination. This aspect of Legilimency is actual mind-reading, in that the wizard can access the exact thoughts someone else is having, including their feelings.

    An example of a mind-reading Legilimens is Queenie Goldstein, who never had to learn Legilimency and was born with it.