Mythology

The Weirdest Offspring in Greek Mythology  

Edira Putri
3.2k votes 615 voters 52.2k views 15 items

List Rules Vote up the most grotesque offspring in Greek mythology.

Considering that there's a lot of freaky sex - and even incest - in stories from ancient Greece and the fact that the gods and goddesses didn't seem to mind taking weird creatures as sex partners, it’s only natural that there are a lot of strange offspring in Greek myths. Just imagine: what would you expect to come out of a union between a woman and a bull? Or a god and the earth? What about a man and a cloud? 

Some of these weird kids in Greek mythology were created from crazy sex, while others were simply born from strange, monstrous parents in unfathomable ways. Their weird nature was then amplified by a dark origin story. 

With all these strange-looking creatures, it’s no wonder that films often take inspiration from Greek mythological creatures. It’s likely that you’ve seen a lot of these weirdest offspring from Greek myths in movies. Centaurs, Pegasus, and Hydra all come from Greek mythology. What’s even more interesting about them is the stories of where they came from and their family drama. Read on for some seriously strange origin stories about the weirdest offspring from Greek myths.

1
Erichthonius
Erichthonius is listed (or ranked) 1 on the list The Weirdest Offspring in Greek Mythology
Photo: Antonio Tempesta/Wikimedia Commons/Public Domain

Almost everything about Erichthonius’s birth was weird. Hephaestus, god of blacksmiths and other craftsmen, tried to seduce the virgin Athena, but she ran from his advances. He chased and eventually caught her. Hephaestus attempted to rape Athena, but she fought him off. He ejaculated on her thigh and Athena wiped his semen off and it fell to the ground, where it impregnated Gaia (the Earth) instead. Almost instantly, Erichthonius emerged from the earth, fully formed. Some versions state that he has a half-man, half-serpent figure. Despite being born from soil, Athena was willing to raise him and he became a legendary ruler of Athens.

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Minotaur is listed (or ranked) 2 on the list The Weirdest Offspring in Greek Mythology
Photo:  RosarioXavier/Pixabay/CC0 1.0

The Minotaur was the son of Pasiphae, Queen of Crete, and her husband's bull. So naturally, he had the physical feature of both creatures: a bull’s head and a man’s body. And, unfortunately, a beastly temper.  

King Minos of Crete was given a very fine white bull by Poseidon so that he could kill it as an offering to the sea god. However, Minos refused to sacrifice the bull and decided to replace the offering with another bull. Furious, Poseidon cursed Pasiphae, causing her to uncontrollably lust for the bull. She eventually gave in to her repulsive desires and mated with it.

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3
The Furies
Erinyes is listed (or ranked) 3 on the list The Weirdest Offspring in Greek Mythology
Photo: William-Adolphe Bouguereau/via Wikimedia Commons

The Furies are goddesses of vengeance, and of course, they have a great story to go with their great title. Their father, Uranus, was castrated by his son, Cronus. When Cronus threw his father’s penis into the sea, a few drops of blood landed on the Earth, and this union birthed the Furies. No one really knows how many Furies there are, but the best-known Furies are Alecto, Megaera, and Tisiphone. Consistent with their dark origin story is the goddesses' physique: some stories claim they have dog-like heads that are wreathed with serpents and their eyes drip with blood. Later, from Uranus’s testicles in the sea, Aphrodite came to life.

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4
Chimera
Chimera is listed (or ranked) 4 on the list The Weirdest Offspring in Greek Mythology
Photo: Heidleberg Painter/Public Domain/via Wikimedia Commons

Being born from the ultimate mother of the beast Echidna (a human-serpent hybrid that represented corruption) and her husband Typhon (a winged giant that caused devastating storms), Chimera did not disappoint her parents. With the heads of a lion and a goat and a serpent as her tail (or was it another head?), Chimera was not any less freaky than her other monster siblings, Cerberus, Sphinx, and Scylla. As if her look wasn't threatening enough, she could also breathe fire from any of her three heads. She was later slain by Pegasus, the winged horse.

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