Lifestyle

8 Secret Calls to Feminism Hidden in Wonder Woman's Costume

Wonder Woman was born of suffrage. She was created by William Marston, a man who was fiercely pro-feminist. Marston fought for women's suffrage while at studying at Harvard. He graduated in 1915, and though Wonder Woman's debut in All Star Comics #8 came 11 years after the 19th Amendment was passed, he drew inspiration from famed suffragettes when creating the character.

Marston snuck several secret threads into his graphic novels to create a tie between Wonder Woman and feminism. Many of those threads are craftily hidden in the patchwork of Wonder Woman's costume. As you read on, you will see the irony not just in her costume but also in her origins, because Wonder Woman was never born at all; no man was, in any way, shape, or form, involved in her creation. Nevertheless, she came to be.

Feminism, by today's standards, is difficult to pin down and near impossible to define, but for good reason: with the advent of social media, women from different cultures and backgrounds can have a discourse about what feminism means to them. We're learning that not every person's experience with and relationship to feminism is the same. But there was a time before it was so easy to communicate with women from across the globe, when feminism, for better or for worse, meant the same thing to pretty much everyone, including its male supporters. Tons of people wore it well but perhaps none wore it better than Wonder Woman.

From her boots to her crown, from her lasso to the very threads holding her uniform together, she will remain an icon of what feminism once was - a female voice in a courtroom, a line of shackled protesters, a scream for the right to regulate pregnancy and a call for a hera, a female hero and Wonder Woman's favorite word. This acclaimed character arrived while a nation was on the cusp of a new beginning. She may have even tipped the scales a bit. Here are some of the most feminist aspects of Wonder Woman's costume.

Wonder Woman was born of women's rights. She was created by a man who was fiercely pro-feminist and he snuck several secret threads into his graphic novels to create a tie between Wonder Woman and feminism. Many of those threads are craftily hidden in the patchwork of Wonder Woman's costume. As you read on, you will see the irony, not just in her costume, but also in her origins, because Wonder Woman was never born at all; no man was, in any way, shape, or form, involved in her creation. Nevertheless, she came to be.

Feminism, by today's standards, is difficult to pin down and near impossible to define, but for good reason: with the advent of social media, women from different cultures and backgrounds can have a discourse about what feminism means to them. We're learning that not every person's experience with and relationship to feminism is the same. But there was a time before it was so easy to communicate with women from across the globe, when feminism, for better or for worse, meant the same thing to pretty much everyone, including its male supporters. Tons of people wore it well but perhaps none wore it better than Wonder Woman.

From her boots to her crown, from her lasso to the very threads holding her uniform together, she will remain an icon of what feminism once was - a female voice in a courtroom, a line of shackled protesters, a scream for the right to regulate pregnancy. This acclaimed character arrived while a nation was on the cusp of a new beginning. She may have even tipped the scales a bit. Here are some of the most feminist aspects of Wonder Woman's costume.

Photo: